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Is DATA pronounced /deita/ or /da: ta/?

Which pronunciation is more correct and modern?
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Comments  (Page 3) 
I'm not sure why 'modern' is one of your criteria, but the original and most proper use of the term is as a plural (of Latin datum) to describe 'bits of known facts' and is pronounced as: day' ta (I think this is your first option) . . . the modern aspect of the word 'data' is its use as being interchangeable with information, but the pronunciation is the same -- daa' ta is not correct, regardless of context. (sorry, I don't have the correct phonetic symbols . . .)
'data' is plural, and 'datum' is singular.
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The first is the way the Queens English and American English pronounce it. The second is the way certain English dialects and Australian and New Zealand English pronounces it.

On the topic of Singular and Plural, strictly speaking the word Data is Plural and the word Datum is singular. The latin root is:

datum, -i : neuter noun. present, gift

Thus the plural is data. ie. This datum, this data.

Classical Latin pronunciation would pronounce the Dat- so it rhymes with Cat-

In the scientific community the rules of pluralisation are strictly adhered to, however in common parlance the term 'datum' is almost never used.

In conclusion, there is no consensus on the pronunciation so it is probably best to pronounce it however you feel most comfortable.
I Hear ya.

generally in english a consonant between 2 vowels causes the preceding vowel to have a long sound (eh opposed to ah(for a)) and a double consonant squeezed between 2 vowels causes the first vowel to have a short sound.

examples.

ata vs. atta (as found in data)

ato vs. atto (as found in tomato)

hello is a short e, and halo is a long a

follow is a short o, polo is a long o

pillow is a short i, pile is a long i

there are many other examples, but data is pronounced with a LONG a
Data should be pronound darta as it comes from the Latin noun "datum", plural "data", where the "a" is n "ar" sound.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Key: day = ā; father = ä; pat =

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Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary: ˈdā-tə, ˈda- also ˈdä-

audio: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/data

Compact Oxford English Dictionary: ˈdeɪtə

Cambridge Dictionary: UK - ˈdeɪ.tə ; US - ˈdeɪ.t ̬ə

audio: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/data

American Heritage Dictionary: dt, dt, dät
A Psychology professor at UC Berkeley said that dah-ta (like "dad") is the singular, while day-ta (like "today") is the plural. In other words, you would say "these day-ta", but "this dah-ta."

I thought datum was the plural.
AnonymousA Psychology professor at UC Berkeley said that dah-ta (like "dad") is the singular, while day-ta (like "today") is the plural. In other words, you would say "these day-ta", but "this dah-ta."

I thought datum was the plural.
The psychology professor should stick to teaching psychology and not try to teach English.
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Actually, I pronounce it da: ta, but everyone else pronounces it deita...
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