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Is DATA pronounced /deita/ or /da: ta/?

Which pronunciation is more correct and modern?
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Comments  (Page 4) 
Captain Picard always called him "Mister Data (dayta)" and he's as English as you get.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard is French. Commander Data has on several occasions made it clear that his name is pronounced 'Day-ta', in order to divorce it from the informational data (pron. 'da-ta') Emotion: wink
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In my experience, the smarter people ie professors/educated pronounce it dayta, never daa-ta. The uneducated one's will say da-ta.
The correct pronunciation is 'deita'.

Its the UK pronunciation.

US people follow it as well.
Ha! Really? The smarter people? Well, the smarter people I know read dictionaries, and every dictionary I have checked gives BOTH pronunciations as legitimate. Neither is to be considered incorrect. Having been in the "Data Processing", "Management Information Systems", "Information Technology" field since 1985, I can assure you that both pronunciations are used by professionals - tho perhaps we aren't as smart as you.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Pronunciation of the word, "data," has morphed since Data Processing technology emerged in the late 1950' and early 1960's.
My introduction to the correct pronunciation was during a 6 week IBM class in May of 1965. The proper pronunciation at the time was "day ta" or "day tuh," or something that sounds like that -- depending on what part of the country you came from.
I still remember the expression used by our instructor:
"You put "DAY TA" in "DAT" computer.
It stuck, and sadly, mispronunciation always reminds me of the youth of the person who mispronounces the word.
The current pronunciation is dictated by "vocality," or the sound and ease of saying "Dat Uh" rather than "Day Ta."

You can confirm the pronunciation by checking the Merriam-Webster dictionary.
They use the following rhyming words for confirmation.
Quote friom M-W ....

"Rhymes with . . . beta, eta, theta, zeta . . . " ==> therfore, it's "data"

So, you still put data in dat computer.

Another word often mispronounced is "Cache."

During the early days of the war in Iraq, news commentators would sometimes ("often?") say "Cash eh," which is apparently a corruption of the term for a small cloth bag of scented herbs called a "Sashet."

I noticed that most of the mispronounciations were made by women commentators (with reason).

Sachets were once popular and often made by women since they had to be stiched together and filled with herbs suitable to the owner who was, invariably, the woman of the house.

Going from "Sachet" to "Cachet" is a natural morphing of the word since both are used to hold things.

However, a "Cache" is pronounced "Cash" and was the term used by pioneers and explorers to designate a secure hiding place. They were generally underground, sealed,and filled with spare supplies and stores when the explorers or pioneers planned to be gone for an extended period.

William Spence, PhD
That is the explanation I have used to try to put the argument to rest but never seems to impress anyone who insists on pronouncing data as "datta" ( but fail to apply this same rule to any of the words that follow : ratta, tatta, rattle, battle, cattle, etc.) .

In one episode of Star Trek Next Generation it seems one writer wanted to address the data/datta pronunciation issue. Guest star Diana Maldar repeated Commander Data's name incorrectly (as short "a" Datta) over and over until it became an issue with him. Acting somewhat surpised she asked, "Data, Datta, what's the difference?" He replied, " One is my name...the other is not."

As such, I think we can take a lesson from this example and conclude that "one is the correct pronunciation and one is not" if we are to have any standardization of the rules regarding pronunciation of the English language. Otherwise much time can be lost in confusion, especially for someone trying to learn the language. If everyone were to try to just accept what they feel comfortable with, chaos would be the result.
Anonymous That is the explanation I have used to try to put the argument to rest but never seems to impress anyone who insists on pronouncing data as "datta" ( but fail to apply this same rule to any of the words that follow : ratta, tatta, rattle, battle, cattle, etc.) . In one episode of Star Trek Next Generation it seems one writer wanted to address the data/datta pronunciation issue. Guest star Diana Maldar repeated Commander Data's name incorrectly (as short "a" Datta) over and over until it became an issue with him. Acting somewhat surpised she asked, "Data, Datta, what's the difference?" He replied, " One is my name...the other is not." As such, I think we can take a lesson from this example and conclude that "one is the correct pronunciation and one is not" if we are to have any standardization of the rules regarding pronunciation of the English language. Otherwise much time can be lost in confusion, especially for someone trying to learn the language. If everyone were to try to just accept what they feel comfortable with, chaos would be the result.
Multiple pronunciations are possible thanks to the great vowel shift and to how natives anglicize foreign words.

via: /i/ or /aɪ/ (first vowel)
diem: /i/ or /aɪ/ (first vowel)
alumni: /i/ or /aɪ/ (last vowel)
Byzantine: /i/ or /aɪ/ (last vowel)
beta, theta, eta, zeta : /eɪ/ or /i/ (first vowel)
omega: /ɛ/ or /eɪ/ or /i (second vowel)
vita: /i/ or /aɪ/
route: /u/ or /aʊ/ (first vowel)
pasta: /ɑ/ or /æ/ (first vowel)
drama: /ɑ/ or /æ/
data: /eɪ/ or /æ/ or /ɑ/ (first vowel).
Venkat (some Indian name): /ɑ/ or /æ/ (second vowel)
Iran: /aɪ/ or /ɪ/ (first vowel); /ɑ/ or /æ/ (second vowel)
Iraq: /ɪ/ (first vowel); /ɑ/ or /æ/ (second vowel)
Amman (Jordan): /ɑ/ or /æ/ (second vowel)
semi: /i/ or /aɪ/ (second vowel)
quasi: /ɑ/ or /eɪ/ (first vowel); /i/ or /aɪ/ (second vowel)
Czechoslovakia: /ɑ/ or /æ/ (fourth vowel)
Pakistan: /ɑ/ or /æ/ (first and third vowels)
trauma: /aʊ/ or /ɔ/
Faustian, Audi, Strauss: /aʊ/ (first vowel)
Schopenhauer: /aʊ/ (third vowel)

/ɑ/ is a pseudo foreignism for the grapheme < a >. It is one of the differences between Canadian and American accents. Canadians tend to nativize < a > with /æ/, whereas Americans prefer /ɑ/. Check "Borrowing with low vowels"

Even Obama's first and third vowels in Pakistan are like /ɑ/, whereas the native vowel is [ə~ɐ]: . This is another reason why Indians and Pakis have problems hearing a low back vowel like /ɑ/.

A rough approximation of the great vowel shift, which is relevant to this thread:

1. /ɛ/ --> /eɪ/ --> /i/ --> /aɪ/ for graphmes < e > , < i >
2. /u/ --> /aʊ/ for the graphme < u >
3. /aʊ/ --> /ɔ/ for the digraphs < aw >, < aw >
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Here in Australia many people say [dah-tah]. Very similar to saying butter. Both technical and non-technical.
Though [dei-tah] pronunciation is also heard, and surprisingly the latter usually comes from more educated people, whereas the data/butter-like speaking sounds (to me at least) a bit red-neckish.

Similar to differences pronouncing the word "schedule".
UK-like pronunciation is contradictory, since the words "schema" and "schedule" have two different pronunciations, whereas Aussies try to be consistent there starting both of them with [sk,,,]
data
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