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Hello.

I can understand when I have to use the prepositions On, In, By with forms of transport. What is the difference in meaning?

Thanks.
Comments  
Shut up and get on the bus!

But I was already in the bus and you made me get off.

I'm afraid you're going to go there on foot, or by taxi.

Can't I go by bicycle?

That would be strange. I've never seen you on a bicycle.

Let's go by subway.

But I don't like it in the subway.

We can go by ferry.

I'd rather go in a rowboat.

You can travel "by means of" any and every transport. Go by foot, by plane, by horse, by train, by taxi, by rickshaw, by canoe, by elevator, by skateboard, etc.

You would get in or into most small conveyances. Get in / into the taxi, canoe, elevator

You'd get on a bicycle or a horse

You'd get on most large conveyances Get on / (board) the plane, train, bus, subway, ferry, oceanliner

Once you get on a large conveyance, you may be said to be in it, except I don't believe you'd ever say you're "in" a large ship. You could be in your cabin, on the ship.

- A.
Avangi Go by foot, by plane, by horse, by train, by taxi, by rickshaw, by canoe, by elevator, by skateboard, etc
AvangiI'm afraid you're going to go there on foot, or by taxi.

Hi Avangi

You say on foot and also by foot.

Just to confirm: Which is the correct preposition?

Many thanks.

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All of them can take "by foot," so both are correct.
I believe in AmE, either on foot or by foot is acceptable.

In BrE,, only on foot is correct. Correct me if I'm wrong.
Well, as you know, both Avangi and I are American, so we'll wait for one of our British friends to stop by to offer an opinion.
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But I was already in the bus and you made me get off.

Once you get on a large conveyance, you may be said to be in it

Do you say, I'm in a plane??? or on

Can I say "I was already on the bus and you made me get off"?
Come to think of it, the large ship / small boat distinction seems to work for the large airliner / small plane distinction - on a 747 / in a Cessna

There seem to be some fine differences. You may say "Get in / on the bus," but only "Get on the 747." "Get on the bus" is more common.

Yes, you may say "I was already in / on the bus." (probably equal frequency)

A.
New2grammar
Can I say "I was already on the bus and you made me get off"?

Yes, you can.

I am on / in the bus. (on is more common)
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