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Do you have the documents on hand?
Do you have the documents at hand?

1. Which of the above is correct in the given context? natural?

2. If both are possible, what is the difference in meaning?
3. If they mean the same, do they mean "Are you holding the documents in front of you?"?

Please advise. Thank you.
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on hand =you have them in your possession
at hand = readily accessible to you; you can get them soon
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Hi,

Do you have the documents on hand?

Do you have the documents at hand?

1. Which of the above is correct in the given context? You haven't given us a context.

natural? Both are OK. You could also say 'to hand'.

2. If both are possible, what is the difference in meaning? None.

3. If they mean the same, do they mean "Are you holding the documents in front of you?"?

No. You'd have to say 'in hand'.

'On hand / at hand' means close to you, readily available to you.

Clive
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Thank you, Clive, for your explanation.

I'm sorry, I didn't give the context. The context is as follows:

I will explain to you how we've come up with the figure for 2011 budget. Do you have the documents on/at/to hand or in hand?

4. Which is the natural thing to say in the context above?

5. Just to clarify "on/at/to hand" means readily available, but not necessarily you are holding it at that moment. Please confirm.
6. On the other hand, does "in hand" also mean it's readily available, but you are holding it at that moment?
7. I read from your post a few moments ago in another thread the following: "...I would have time in hand". Does it mean readily available time? If not, what does it mean?
I'm sorry, please suppose that the context is said on the phone where one explains the figure to someone on the other line. Thanks.
Hi,

I suggest this.

I'll explain to you how we've come up with the figure for the 2011 budget. Do you have the documents in front of you?

Clive
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Both are possible. It is not a usual context, so I give my interpretation:

"at hand" means "nearby, within reach,' so I would not have to spend any time or effort to get these documents if they were needed - they are readily available. If we were in a meeting in a conference room, the documents might be on my desk in the office down the hall.

"on hand" means that I possess the documents, and could get them if necessary. They are held "in reserve". This expression is most heard as "cash on hand" - this is money that is in reserve for immediate expenses.
If we were in a meeting in a conference room, I might have to ask an assistant to locate the documents somewhere in a filing cabinet.

"in hand" means that they are under my control. If we were in a meeting in a conference room, the documents might be in the pile of papers in front of me.
Thank you, again, for your response and suggestion.

I understand your suggestion is more straight to the point and would be more likely the one I would use. However, I'd just like to know the difference in meaning between the expressions "on/at/to hand" and "in hand".

Based on your previous post, I think the actual difference is "on/at/to hand" means the object is close to the person but not holding it, whereas "in hand" means the object is literally in the person's hand holding it. Would you confirm, please? Thank you.
Hi,

I understand your suggestion is more straight to the point and would be more likely the one I would use. However, I'd just like to know the difference in meaning between the expressions "on/at/to hand" and "in hand".

Based on your previous post, I think the actual difference is "on/at/to hand" means the object is close to the person but not holding it, close to you, or possibly even in your hand

whereas "in hand" means the object is literally in the person's hand holding it. It can mean that. But it also has other meanings,

eg if I have something in hand, it often means that I am dealing with it, giving it my attention.

If I have something in my hand, it means I am actually holding it.

If something is in my hands, it may mean I am holding it, or it may mean I am the one who deals with it and makes decisions about it.

Would you confirm, please?

Clive
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AlpheccaStars"at hand" means "nearby, within reach,' so I would not have to spend any time or effort to get these documents if they were needed - they are readily available. If we were in a meeting in a conference room, the documents might be on my desk in the office down the hall.

"on hand" means that I possess the documents, and could get them if necessary. They are held "in reserve". This expression is most heard as "cash on hand" - this is money that is in reserve for immediate expenses.
If we were in a meeting in a conference room, I might have to ask an assistant to locate the documents somewhere in a filing cabinet.

"in hand" means that they are under my control. If we were in a meeting in a conference room, the documents might be in the pile of papers in front of me.

Thank you, AlpheccaStars, for your input on this.
I would say that the actual difference between these expressions it the proximity or nearness to the "documents" in the given example. In the order of descending proximity or nearness, it would be as follows:

documents in hand (closest)

documents at hand
documents on hand (farthest)

1. Please confirm the order of proximity above.
2. Does "in hand" mean it's the document is in front of me, but I'm not necessarily holding it?
3. Which of the above would "to hand" be equivalent to?
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