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Amanda: I hope you don't feel obligated to entertain me.
Jude's only gone for a couple days. (2 days, right?)

Lex: I don't believe in obligations. (He doesn't feel obligated?)Besides, your fiancé
did me a favor. I wasn't looking forward to a night out on my own. (He wasn't eager
to get out alone?)
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Hi,

Amanda: I hope you don't feel obligated to entertain me.

Jude's only gone for a couple days. (2 days, right?) Not necessarily 2. A few days.

Lex: I don't believe in obligations. (He doesn't feel obligated?He doesn't believe that a pesrson should feel obligated )Besides, your fiancé

did me a favor. I wasn't looking forward to a night out on my own. (He wasn't eager

to get go out alone?) Yes.

Clive
Comments  
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Jude's only gone for a couple days. (2 days, right?) Not necessarily 2. A few days.
How can you know when a person means two or few when they use 'couple'?
Do you refer to the 'of' (couple of)? Or the use of 'a' (a couple)? Like this for instance:
-We'll know in a couple hours.
-What happens in two hours?
How does the second person understand it's 2 hours?
Hi,

How can you know when a person means two or few when they use 'couple'?

Do you refer to the 'of' (couple of)? Or the use of 'a' (a couple)? Like this for instance:

-We'll know in a couple hours. It may be regional. I always say 'a couple of'.
-What happens in two hours?

How does the second person understand it's 2 hours? Sometimes it's apparent from the context. If not, he can guess. If the first speaker figures that precision is important, he probably wouldn't say 'a couple of'. Sometimes, the exact number is unimportant.

Clive

Interesting! Thanks, Clive!
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