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Hi everybody,

Can you explain the different of using On / Off and Of / Off ?

Thank you in advance !
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hiya, what I know is

On / Off means to turn something on /off,.. alittle bit like open/close

of means belong to..

.i think of and off just looks like earchother..
Sweety_puddingi think of and off just looks like earchother..

I don't agree with this.

In fact I don't see any relation between "of" and "off"

"of" is a preposition e.g. President of America, son of Mr. List.

"off" is an adjective meaning "not in operation" eg. Turn off the computer. The lights are off.

I found following meaning when it is used as adverb

"From particular thing, place or position" -- they drove off

"No longer on or in contact" eg. clear off the dirt

SG
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well,what i mean,

by "just looks like earchother,"

is the spellings ..of and off ..^ ^
Science_guru
Sweety_pudding
i think of and off just looks like earchother..

I don't agree with this.

In fact I don't see any relation between "of" and "off"

"of" is a preposition e.g. President of America, son of Mr. List.

"off" is an adjective meaning "not in operation" eg. Turn off the computer. The lights are off.

I found following meaning when it is used as adverb

"From particular thing, place or position" -- they drove off

"No longer on or in contact" eg. clear off the dirt

SG

Even the pronunciation is different. Final sound for "off" is "f". For "of" it's "v" when the word comes before a vowel sound, and "uh" or "ah" (as in sorta = sort of) when it comes before a consonant sound. Well, generally in AmE, that is. But if the "uh" or "ah" seems awkward to you, I suggest sticking to the "v". You won't go wrong.

I'm in a bit of a hurry. (v sound)

Here's a list of materials I need.
Maybe 'earchother' looks like 'each other', but it means something really different...
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DavkettMaybe 'earchother' looks like 'each other', but it means something really different...
w h o o p s ,why?is there anything wrong wiv "i think they just looks like eachother?" do u mind to explain it ? thanks
I was making a joke out of the posts, because 'earchother' is not a word; neither is 'eachother'. What you most likely meant to write is 'each other' (two words). So when you wrote, '...they just look like earchother', we can pretty much define 'earchother' any way we want. That is what can happen when a word is mispelled.

As for 'of' looking like 'off'--only if the looker has double vision. Does it, for instance, also look like 'oof'? There are many words in a language that look something like other words in that language. Probably thousand of examples could be shown in English. Therefore, looking something like another word is no excuse for thinking the look-alike words mean the same thing. In fact, there is a whole category of words, known as 'homographs'; these are words that look exactly alike, but mean different things.
Sweety_pudding
DavkettMaybe 'earchother' looks like 'each other', but it means something really different...
w h o o p s ,why?is there anything wrong wiv "i think they just looks like eachother?" do u mind to explain it ? thanks

I see two differences.

1) I don't know if the word "earchother" exists in english.

2) Assuming a typo in the above word, I think there should be two words "each" and "other" not a single word "eachother"

SG
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