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What's the difference between "on sale" and "for sale".
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An item that is "for sale" simply means it is available for purchase.

An item that is "on sale" means that there is a special, lower price for it right then.
Great explanation!! Now I see the difference.
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Hi GG,

An item that is "on sale" means that there is a special, lower price for it right then. That's certainly one meaning. However, I rather feel that, in a non-special prices context, 'on sale' can just mean 'available for purchase'.

Perhaps other people may comment? I wonder if there is possibly a BrE vs. AmE thing here?

Best wishes, Clive
CliveI wonder if there is possibly a BrE vs. AmE thing here?
Yes, it is a BrE/AmE thing:

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for sale
available to buy:
Is this painting for sale?
Our neighbours put their house up for sale (= started to advertise
that they want to sell it) last week.

on sale MAINLY US (UK USUALLY in the sale)
reduced in price:
Can you tell me if this dress is in the sale?

on sale UK
available to buy in a shop:
On sale at record stores now.

(from Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary)
http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?dict=CALD&key=69547
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Very interesting...
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Marius Hancuon sale UK
available to buy in a shop:
On sale at record stores now.

This is used in AmE also. "When does the new book go on sale?" This can mean both available for purchase, and a reduced price.

We don't use "in the sale" though.

Peace be upon u ..

Sorry for interrupting .. But I still can't find big differences

between both of them !!

I may be fully mistaken .. but the question is ..

Will I be wrong if I use any of both instead the other in any sentence ??

I mean ..

** He put his car up on sale .

Is it all right to say :-

** He put his car up for sale .

Thanks alot and waiting for your guiding replies ..

( I'm not a native speaker .. I'm Egyptian )

Thanks again .
Hi,

Will I be wrong if I use any of both instead the other in any sentence ??

I mean .. ** He put his car up on sale .

Yes, you'll be wrong. 'On sale', meaning available for purchase, sounds odd if there is just one item. In addition, when you use 'up', the idiomatic phrase is 'up for sale'.

Best wishes, Clive
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