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Tiktok is on the verge of getting banned in America.


Does htis mean that TikTok is definitely going to be banned in America very soon?

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Does this mean that TikTok is definitely going to be banned in America very soon?

Tiktok is on the verge of getting banned in America.

No. 'might be banned soon' Not 'will be banned soon'.

CJ

So saying "Tiktok is on the verge of getting banned in America" is different from saying "Tiktok is about to get banned in America"?

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So saying "Tiktok is on the verge of getting banned in America" is different from saying "Tiktok is about to get banned in America"?

They are the same.

I found dictionary definitions for "on the verge of" and "about to", and both said "close to doing something soon".

CJ

Didn't you say that "about to" implies that something WILL happen in the near future, while "on the verge of" only implies a possibility?

I asked on "english stack exchange", and found this answer.

There is a difference.

"About to" implies that the progression toward a change is already underway and that the change will, with reasonable certainty, occur shortly (though with the meaning of "shortly" being highly dependent on specific context). If a bridge is "about to collapse" then one expects that, short of Superman intervening, it will collapse.

"On the verge of" means that factors are approaching the "tipping point" where the change will occur, and, if factors continue in that direction, the change is likely to occur. But factors may not continue in the same direction. The bridge may be "on the verge of collapsing", but then the water stops rising and the situation becomes less dire

Didn't you say that "about to" implies that something WILL happen in the near future, while "on the verge of" only implies a possibility?

I don't know. Where is that? Do you have the link?

CJ

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https://www.englishforums.com/English/AboutTo/bpdcxv/post.htm


Are there any differences between:


"He is almost dead."

"He is on the verge of death."

"He is about to die."

Here's an example: 0:12 to 0:20

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Didn't you say that "about to" implies that something WILL happen in the near future, while "on the verge of" only implies a possibility?

I checked that link, and I didn't see anything that was a contrast between the meanings of "about to" and "on the verge of". So no, I don't recall ever making that contrast. For me they are basically the same.

I don't think I agree with the answer you got on English Stack Exchange. To me, if the bridge is about to collapse, it's on the verge of collapsing. If the bridge is on the verge of collapsing, it's about to collapse. But, as I mentioned in that previous post, there is always the possibility that something will happen that stops the action, causing the final collapse not to occur.

Even so, if you like that explanation better, by all means, go with it. It makes a very subtle distinction between those two expressions that you may like. However, I don't think there will ever be any practical value in parsing the meaning so precisely. No one is even going to notice if you say 'on the verge of' instead of 'about to' — or the other way around. In the heat of conversation those expressions will be taken as exactly the same in meaning no matter how subtly different some people may think they are.

CJ

Here's an example: 0:12 to 0:20

is on the verge of being banned ~ is about to be banned

If the speaker had said 'is about to be banned', I would not have thought he meant something different from what he actually said, namely, 'is on the verge of being banned'.

Are there any differences between: "He is almost dead.""He is on the verge of death.""He is about to die."

The only differences are syntactic and stylistic. There are no semantic differences (differences in meaning).

CJ

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