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Once Nora has finished this work, get her started on the Friday account.

Can we say...

Once Nora finishes this work, get her started on the Friday account.

If Nora has finished this work, get her started on the Friday account.

If Nora finishes this work, get her started on the Friday account.

Because Nora has finished this work, get her started on the Friday account.

As Nora has finished this work, get her started on the Friday account.

Why or why not? Please advise.

LC
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Comments  (Page 2) 
I think that as can be used, but would have the meaning of because, as you've mentioned, and would change the meaning wrt once.

Thus, it really depends on what you intend to say.
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But back to the question, if there are four words to choose from: Once, While, As, and So, which is the best answer?
It says "the best answer", not "the only answer". That's what is so insidious about these tests!

as is not as good as once but it's not incorrect.

It's simply more likely to say that someone should start on another job after (once) they finish the first job rather than to say that someone should start on another job because (as) they have finished the first. There is no causation implied in doing two jobs, one after the other.

In the same context of the workplace, here's how that clause with as would more likely be completed:

As Nora has finished this work, she deserves a day off to rest.
As Nora has finished this work, she won't have to come in on the weekend to finish it.

CJ