+1
Hi,

The usual narrative is that capitalism and perfect competition are synonyms. No one is a monopoly. Firms compete and profits are competed away. But that’s a curious narrative. A better one frames capitalism and perfect competition as opposites; capitalism is about the accumulation of capital, whereas the world of perfect competition is one in which you can’t make any money. Why people tend to view capitalism and perfect competition as interchangeable is thus an interesting question that’s worth exploring from several different angles.

The first thing to recognize is that our bias favoring competition is deep-rooted. Competition is seen as almost quintessentially American. It builds character. We learn a lot from it. We see the competitive ideology at work in education. There is a sense in which extreme forms of competition are seen as setting one up for future, non-competitive success.

Let me start with the first bold sentence.

A better one frames capitalism and perfect competition as opposites.

Here "one" is a substiute for the noun previously mentioned, namely "narative".

Q1) Correct?

Now the second bold sentence.

Capitalism is about the accumulation of capital, whereas the world of perfect competition is one in which you can’t make any money.

Q2) What does "one" refer to?

The last sentence in bold is as follows:

There is a sense in which extreme forms of competition are seen as setting one up for future, non-competitive success.

Q3) It seems to me that "one" refers to "non-competitive success". As far as I know, pro-nominal "one" takes only count nouns as antecedents, so it doesn't seem to fit the characteristic of pro-nominal "one" here. Could you expain this use of "one"?

ex) The advice you gave me was more useful than the one I recived from Amber.(X)

I'd appreciate your help.
+0
Hi,

The usual narrative is that capitalism and perfect competition are synonyms. No one is a monopoly. Firms compete and profits are competed away. But that’s a curious narrative. A better one frames capitalism and perfect competition as opposites; capitalism is about the accumulation of capital, whereas the world of perfect competition is one in which you can’t make any money. Why people tend to view capitalism and perfect competition as interchangeable is thus an interesting question that’s worth exploring from several different angles.

The first thing to recognize is that our bias favoring competition is deep-rooted. Competition is seen as almost quintessentially American. It builds character. We learn a lot from it. We see the competitive ideology at work in education. There is a sense in which extreme forms of competition are seen as setting one up for future, non-competitive success.

Let me start with the first bold sentence.

A better one frames capitalism and perfect competition as opposites.

Here "one" is a substiute for the noun previously mentioned, namely "narative".

Q1) Correct? Yes

Now the second bold sentence.

Capitalism is about the accumulation of capital, whereas the world of perfect competition is one in which you can’t make any money.

Q2) What does "one" refer to? world

The last sentence in bold is as follows:

There is a sense in which extreme forms of competition are seen as setting one up for future, non-competitive success.

Q3) It seems to me that "one" refers to "non-competitive success". As far as I know, pro-nominal "one" takes only count nouns as antecedents, so it doesn't seem to fit the characteristic of pro-nominal "one" here. Could you expain this use of "one"? Sorry, you have completely misunderstood. It's the third-person, impersonal pronoun. You could replace it, less elegantly, with the phrase, 'a person'.

ex) The advice you gave me was more useful than the one I recived from Amber.(X)

Clive
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Thank you fory your reply, Clive.

It's the third-person, impersonal pronoun. You could replace it, less elegantly, with the phrase, 'a person'.

OK. I misread it. A is setting someone up for B.(where A=extreme competition, B=non-competitive success in the future) So this means that A is putting someone in a position where they are likely to get B. Right?
Hi,

That's the general idea, yes.

Clive
Thank you for your help, Clive.
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