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" I was to go to my hometown" may I know the meaning of this sentence
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You were instructed to go there.

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cat navy 425 " I was to go to my hometown" may I know the meaning of this sentence

I was supposed to go to my hometown.
I had to go to my hometown.

CJ

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CJ

I have a question related to this structure.

I am to meet my uncle this evening.

Can this also mean that I have planned to meet him this evening?

CalifJimcat navy 425 " I was to go to my hometown" may I know the meaning of this sentenceI was supposed to go to my hometown.I had to go to my hometown.CJ

Is I was to go to my hometown ambiguous?

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I mean an ambiguity about the obligation of "going to my hometown". Is it my personal obligation or is it imposed on me?

vsureshI have a question related to this structure.I am to meet my uncle this evening.Can this also mean that I have planned to meet him this evening?

Yes, but it seems to me that this "planning" interpretation is more likely to be found in journalism: New train station (is) to be constructed near the downtown area.

It's somewhat rare, I'd say, to hear someone use the 'is to' idiom to say they have something planned. It's almost exclusively a written form, not a conversational form. (At least that's my best guess based on my own experience.)

CJ

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tkacka15Is I was to go to my hometown ambiguous?-----------I mean an ambiguity about the obligation of "going to my hometown". Is it my personal obligation or is it imposed on me?

Typically it's imposed on you, but the 'is to' idiom seems almost designed to be ambiguous, so there may be cases where the obligation is self-imposed. At the moment I can't think of a sentence that illustrates that unambiguously.

CJ

CalifJim
vsureshI have a question related to this structure.I am to meet my uncle this evening.Can this also mean that I have planned to meet him this evening?

Yes, but it seems to me that this "planning" interpretation is more likely to be found in journalism: New train station (is) to be constructed near the downtown area.

It's somewhat rare, I'd say, to hear someone use the 'is to' idiom to say they have something planned. It's almost exclusively a written form, not a conversational form. (At least that's my best guess based on my own experience.)

CJ

Thank you, CJ.