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One of my friend likes Swimming.

None of my friends want to go to college.

Neither of my friends take the trip to Canada.

Either of them are tall.

Any of my girl friends are jealous.

Neither of my friends are rich.

One of my friends is really like to wear bikini.

Are they OK?

Thank You
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Comments  
no, sometimes not:

One of my friend likes Swimming. wrong One of my friends likes Swimming.

None of my friends want to go to college. wrong None of my friends wants to go to college.

Neither of my friends take the trip to Canada. maybe here's better takes

Any of my girl friends are jealous. wrong Any of my girlfriends is jealous.

Neither of my friends are rich. the same, i think,here's better is

One of my friends is really like to wear bikini. wrong One of my friends really likes to wear bikini.



Ksenya
Neither of my friends takes the trip to Canada. This is not idiomatic. Neither of my friends will take a trip to Canada, Neither of my friends took a trip to Canada.

Any of my girlfriends is jealous. This is also not idiomatic. What are you trying to say? Something like Any of my girlfriends would be jealous if they knew he had kissed me? Any... is adjective leaves the reader wanting to know more about the sentence.

One of my friends really likes to wear a bikini (or wear bikinis).



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None of my friends want to go to college is correct. So is None of my friends wants to go to college.

Cheers
CB
One of my friends likes Sswimming.

None of my friends want to go to college. (or wants)

Neither of my friends take is taking the trip to Canada.

Either of them are tall. Neither of them is tall. Both of them are tall.

Any All of my girl friends are jealous.

Neither of my friends are rich. (also is rich)

One of my friends is really likes to wear a bikini.

CJ
"Neither of my friends are rich. (also is rich)"

Hi CJ
On this side of the Atlantic neither always takes a singular verb: Neither of my friends is rich.

Cheers
CB
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Hmmm. I think to be absolutely correct, an American should say the same. I guess it sounded okay to me as I breezed by it. I suppose a lot of Americans use "are" there, and so it didn't set off any alarms!

CJ
I know people say are due to the plural friends, but friends isn't what determines the form of the verb. There's a similar mistake, very common in many languages that make a distinction between singular and plural verbs - even in Finnish people make this mistake:

He is one of the boys who has seen it.

This is wrong. The boys is the antecedent, not one, and so the sentence should be:

He is one of the boys who have seen it.

Cheers
CB

PS It's soccer time, Sweden against Paraguay, which means no more posts from me tonight.
1. Neither of my friends are rich.
2. Neither of my friends is rich.

My inclination would be to use #1; though #2 is fine. The OED seems happy with "neither of" + noun phrase + plural verb, and gives an example:

3. Neither of us are the proper judges.

It also seems to be acceptable in literary contexts:

4. At length, when these two potentates had wearied themselves with waging war upon one another, they agreed upon an interview, at which neither of their counsellors were to be present. (Addison)

5. Now the reader will be pleased to consider, that, as neither of these men were fools... (Fielding)

6. For it may be remarked in the course of this little conversation...that though Miss Rebecca Sharp has twice had occasion to thank Heaven, it has been, in the first place, for ridding her of some person whom she hated, and secondly, for enabling her to bring her enemies to some sort of perplexity or confusion; neither of which are very amiable motives for religious gratitude... (Thackeray)

And here are some implicit plurals:

7. According to Madame F., neither of the Rougiers had taken off their clothes for four years. (Orwell)

8. Stanley has obtained permission to apply personally to his friends; and, as they have neither of them ever seen him, let Sir Oliver assume his character (Sheridan)

9. Isabel was silent; neither of them had seated themselves; they stood there with a certain air of defiance. (H. James)

MrP
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