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(1) More and more people have cellular phones, and it seems that most young people have one.
(2)
More and more people have cellular phones, and it seems that most young people have ones.

Are they both OK? Or is one is better than the other? If so, then why is it better?
1 2
Comments  
#1 is correct.
Hi Taka

As SG wrote, (1) is correct.
Sentence (2) would be acceptable with the word 'them' instead of 'ones':
More and more people have cellular phones, and it seems that most young people have them.

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Yankee,

A little while ago, I asked the same kind of question about 'singular/plural':

http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/SingularPluralAgain/dzlbk/Post.htm

Then, I thought I came to the simple conclusion that, in principle, the singular corresponds to the singular, and the plural to the plural.

However, as for the cell phone sentence, I also knew from my experience that 'one' was better than 'ones'; the problem is, I don't know why, what kind of reason there is behind.

Could you tell me why, in this case, 'one (singular)', not 'ones (plural), is prefered for 'cellular phones (plural)'?
Hi Taka

When 'ones' is used, it is generally preceded by 'the'. In other words, 'the ones' is used to refer to specific, individual things.

These phones are cheap. The ones on display over there are more expensive.

YankeeHi Taka

When 'ones' is used, it is generally preceded by 'the'. In other words, 'the ones' is used to refer to specific, individual things.

These phones are cheap. The ones on display over there are more expensive.

???

Are you sure, Yankee?

Then, what about this?

The analysis of church services has shown that the sociocultural system creates definitions of situations, not ones which mechanically determine the behavior of speakers, but ones which are systematically related to particular occasions and the behavior that ocurrs within them.

http://books.google.com/books?id=Q8gxC1m2kEwC&pg=PA188&dq=%22but+ones%22&sig=yg6YgkoBfpd8CVy0iiR_...

That's one of many 'ones-without-the' examples that I've found on Google.
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Hi Taka

The examples you gave in you last post are much more specific than what you wrote in your first post in sentence (2). And that was the main point of what I was trying to get across to you. Specificity. In your original sentence (2), you tried to use 'ones' much too generally. In your last post, the word 'ones' is defined and narrowed down to specific types. Using the word 'the' does the same sort of thing. It refers back to something specific.
I think I'd agree with Yankee; there do seem to be two kinds of "one", in this usage (if we exclude cases where "one" = "person"):

1. "I have a question." "I have one too."

— "one" stands for "one of those", i.e. "a member of the class {question}".

Cf.

2. "There's my house." "Is it the one with the red door?"

— "one" refers specifically to "house".

It seems to me that the plural "ones" is only possible in type 2; thus:

3. "I have a few questions." "I have ones some too."

4. "Those are my sheep over there." "What, the ones escaping through the gap in the hedge?"

MrP
MrPedanticI think I'd agree with Yankee; there do seem to be two kinds of "one"

Quite honestly, I was not familiar with the ones-only-for-the-specific theory.

Well, MrP. Then, what is the cognitive difference in understanding these two below?

(1)The analysis of church services has shown that the sociocultural system creates definitions of situations, not ones which mechanically determine the behavior of speakers, but ones which are systematically related to particular occasions and the behavior that ocurrs within them.

and

(2) The analysis of church services has shown that the sociocultural system creates definitions of situations, not those which mechanically determine the behavior of speakers, but those which are systematically related to particular occasions and the behavior that ocurrs within them.
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