The chart below is neat, yet it doesn't provide information for the pronoun ‘one'. As in ‘One needs to look up words they don't understand'. Does ‘one' have a case, and is the plural ‘ones' or ‘one's' good English. Webster's New Riverside University Dictionary has ‘one' appearing as a pronoun, but there is no plural and no other information given.
John Freck
Pronoun Case
Personal Pronouns
Singular Subjective Objective Possessive First Person I me my, mine Second Person you you your, yours Third Person he, she, it him, her, it his, her, hers, its

Plural
First Person we us our, ours Second Person you you your, yours Third Person they them their, theirs
Relative and interrogative pronouns
Subjective Objective Possessive
who whom whose
whoever whomever
1 2 3 4
John Freck typed thus:
What an interesting question about which I had never thought before. =20 The answers below are from an intuitive English speaker - others will=20 correct me if I'm wrong.
"one" as a personal pronoun is nearly dead in modern English - it=20 remains in UK English as a more polite or more inclusive way of=20 saying "I" or "we".
The chart below is neat, yet it doesn't provide information for the pronoun =91one'. As in =91One needs to look up words they don't understand'.

That sounds wrong to me. I would say "One needs to look up words one=20 doesn't understand".
Does =91one' have a case

A case? Do you mean does it decline? Not so as you'd notice.
and is the plural =91ones' or =91one's' good English.

No. Neither. There isn't a plural.
Webster's New Riverside University Dictionary has =91one' appearing as a pronoun, but there is no plural and no other information given.

It is a pronoun, comparable to the French pronoun "on".
Pronoun Case Personal Pronouns Singular Subjective Objective Possessive First Person I me my, mine Second Person you you your, yours Third Person he, she, it him, her, it his, her, hers, its

one one's
I can't think of a way of using it as the object of a verb, nor in=20 the dative. "He hit one" and "Give that to one" are both=20 insupportable.
Plural First Person we us our, ours Second Person you you your, yours Third Person they them their, theirs =20

Not relevant.
Relative and interrogative pronouns Subjective Objective Possessive who whom whose whoever whomever

Also not relevant.
=20
David
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D
The chart below is neat, yet it doesn't provide information for the pronoun ‘one'. As in ‘One needs to look up words they don't understand'. Does ‘one' have a case, and is the plural ‘ones' or ‘one's' good English.

"One" in this context is an indefinite limiting adjective employed as a noun. It is essentially equivalent to "I" for grammatical purposes (and often literary ones), but takes the infrequent plural use more handily than does bare "I".
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The chart below is neat, yet it doesn't provide information for the pronoun ?one'. As in ?One needs to look up words they don't understand'. Does ?one' have a case, and is the plural ?ones' or ?one's' good English.

They both are, but they say different things. It's okay to write
Most members were present, but certain ones were absent

but "One's" is possessive case, as in
One has one's pride, doesn't one?
Webster's New Riverside University Dictionary has ?one' appearing as a pronoun, but there is no plural and no other information ... yours Third Person they them their, theirs Relative and interrogative pronouns Subjective Objective Possessive who whom whose whoever whomever

You've raised a good question, but you should expand it to include other pronouns about which similar questions could be asked:
"Anyone", "anybody", "someone", "somebody", "everybody", "everyone", "some", and probably others I'm not remembering at the moment, are all listed as pronouns in dictionaries.

They have no gender, and they normally don't have plurals, although there are exceptionable cases where they are given plurals, as in
She was grieving for a certain someone who had walked out on her, but she had other someones to fall back on.
Some may say that the pronouns I've listed are all third person only, but I believe examples can be devised to show each of them in both first- and second-person senses. For example, "anyone" has a second-person sense in
Anyone here who doesn't like what we're saying is
free to leave
And possibly a first-person sense in
How can anyone endure the abuse I've suffered?
"One" is used in the first person, as in the OED quotation,
1959 E. H. CLEMENTS High Tension ii. 19 'Do you oftenhave your fan-mail in person?'..'Not often. One isn't in the telephone book'.
But I don't think that usage is common among American speakers or writers. I, for one, would never use it.

There are those who might say that "one" is used in the first person in the example I've written above:
One has one's pride, doesn't one?
I wouldn't agree. I consider it equivalent to saying

Everyone has his or her pride; isn't that true?
(sorry for top posting)
Bob, your response to the original poster is wonderful! I've also wondered from time to time about "one" as well as the other pronouns you introduce into the lesson. You have done a great job of explaining your answers. Nice going!
-YJ
The chart below is neat, yet it doesn't provide information ... case, and is the plural ?ones' or ?one's' good English.

They both are, but they say different things. It's okay to write Most members were present, but certain ones were absent but "One's" is possessive case, as in One has one's pride, doesn't one?
The chart below is neat, yet it doesn't provide information for the pronoun ‘one'. As in ‘One needs to look up words they don't understand'.

This sentence strikes me as really a problem. It's problem enough to follow he or she with they, but "one" is explicitly singular.

One needs to look up words he doesn't understand. Or One needs to look up words one doesn't understand.
Does ‘one' have a case,

Like most nouns, no. I don't think it is a pronoun. It may be an adjective that was used as a substantive, and became a noun.
and is the plural ‘ones' or

Yes.
As in, Those aren't the ones I want. Get me the other ones.

I've been paying attention since the last thread on ones, and I've heard two people on NPR use "ones" and it sounded perfectly normal, just as the two examples here do.
‘one's' good English. Webster's New Riverside University Dictionary has ‘one' appearing as a pronoun, but there is no plural and no other information given.

No plural given because it is regular. They think it is a pronoun, huh? Even if perhaps it is a pronoun, all its singular forms are the same and all its plural
John Freck Pronoun Case Personal Pronouns Singular Subjective Objective Possessive First Person ... who whom whose whoever whomever

s/ meirman If you are emailing me please
say if you are posting the same response.
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I believe examples can be devised to show each of them in both first- and second-person senses.

Hmm. Yes, well there is that rather wonderfully silly joke about Prince Charles' question to Princess Diana on their wedding night: "Would one like one to give one one?"
RobertE
I believe examples can be devised to show each of them in both first- and second-person senses.

Hmm. Yes, well there is that rather wonderfully silly joke about Prince Charles' question to Princess Diana on their wedding night: "Would one like one to give one one?"

Did he give at the orifice?
The cool thing about the possessive pronoun "one's" is that it shows that people who sneer "Possessive pronouns can't have an apostrophe in them" are full of ***.

\\P. Schultz
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