+0
a. People get into trouble with grief when they try to not feel something--either ignore it or get into the booze to try to supress it.

b. People get into trouble with grief when they try to not feel something--whether they ignore it or get into the booze to try to supress it.

Do these above have the same meaning?

What is the difference between "get into the booze to try and (to) supress it/to try to supress it"?

Thanks
Comments  
Hi,

a. People get into trouble with grief when they try to not feel something--either ignore it or get into the booze to try to supress it.

b. People get into trouble with grief when they try to not feel something--whether they ignore it or get into the booze to try to supress it.

Do these above have the same meaning? A does not seem grammatical to me.

What is the difference between "get into the booze to try and (to) supress it/to try to supress it"?

None.

Clive
B is not quite right (semantically) because those aren't the only 2 options, so only A should be used.

'Try and + verb' and 'try to + verb' are synonymous alternatives, but 'try and to = verb' is not good grammar. 'Try and' is common, especially in speech, but it is not liked by some grammarians; nevertheless, it is well established in the language.

'Suppress' is spelt thus.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Mister MicawberB is not quite right (semantically) because those aren't the only 2 options, so only A should be used.
Aren't either and whether interchangeable sometimes though? Definition of whether:

Whether: Either: He passed the test, whether by skill or luck.





And why can't whether be used to show only some of the options? Definition of whether:



Whether: Used to introduce alternative possibilities:
Like 'either', 'whether' suggests 2 alternatives; that is a part of its meaning. If there are more, we presume that the ones given are examples from the set. 'Skill' and 'luck', however, represent the only two available in that idiom: there is no 3rd way.
Hi,

a. People get into trouble with grief when they try to not feel something--either ignore it or get into the booze to try to supress it.

I would rewrite this as

a. People get into trouble with grief when they try to not feel something--either by ignoring it or by getting into the booze to try to supress it.

Best wishes, Clive
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
I'm sorry, but I do not follow why you're saying b is not OK while a is. As you said, they both suggest 2 alternatives (although my dictionary says 2 or more), so why would one be wrong and one not?
Clive
I would rewrite this as

a. People get into trouble with grief when they try to not feel something--either by ignoring it or by getting into the booze to try to supress it.

Hi, Clive

I see the original as perhaps a reduced from of this, so I'm not sure if your re-write is necessary. Of course, I am not entirely sure though.

a. People get into trouble with grief when they try to not feel something--(when they try to) either ignore it or get into the booze to try to supress it.
I'm sorry, but I do not follow why you're saying b is not OK while a is. As you said, they both suggest 2 alternatives (although my dictionary says 2 or more), so why would one be wrong and one not?

Now I'm not sure why-- when I read them, 'either' sounds like it is offering 2 (of perhaps more) alternatives, while 'whether' sounds like it is presenting the only 2 alternatives as a fiat.

That's the best I can do on this one. Maybe it's just me.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.