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In swimming, degree of body rotation will change (lessen) at high speeds, particularly all-out sprint speeds because there is so litttle time between strokes at a high tempo. Long distance will generally use more rotation, both breathing and non-breathing.

Would it be clearer and more correct to include 'when' after both?

Thanks
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It is redundant to add the word "when",the original one is more natural.
Hi,

In swimming, degree of body rotation will change (lessen) at high speeds, particularly all-out sprint speeds because there is so litttle time between strokes at a high tempo. Long distance will generally use more rotation, both breathing and non-breathing.

Would it be clearer and more correct to include 'when' after both?

It wouldn't be correct. The meaning is this.

In swimming, degree of body rotation will change (lessen) at high speeds, particularly all-out sprint speeds because there is so litttle time between strokes at a high tempo. Long distance will generally use more rotation, both breathing rotation and non-breathing rotation.

In other words, breathing and non-breathing are used here as adjectives.

With 'when', you'd have to say eg

Long distance will generally use more rotation, both when breathing in rotation and not breathing in rotation.

Clive
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The way it's written, it sounds as if there are concepts of "breathing rotation" and "non-breathing rotation". If that wasn't the intention then some tweaking would be beneficial. You can't just insert "when" because "when ... non-breathing" won't work. Maybe "both when breathing and when between breaths"? I have a feeling there ought to be a better way of saying this, but right now it eludes me.

"Long distance will generally use..." is also poorly formed. Overall, the paragraph reads like notes that haven't been fully worked up.
CliveIn other words, breathing and non-breathing are used here as adjectives.
Oh, right. So there are concepts of "breathing rotation" and "non-breathing rotation"?
CliveLong distance will generally use more rotation, both when breathing in rotation and not breathing in rotation.
To me, that sounds like a breathing regime rather than physical rotation of one's body.

I should mention, in case it's not obvious, that I know nothing about this subject!
Thanks, Clive

So it modifies roation?

Long distance will generally use more roation, both breath roation and non-breathing rotation.

Would this be preferred?

Long distance will generally use more breath roation and non-breath rotation.
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Hi,

I know about these things because I swim a lot.Emotion: geeked

“Long distance (swimming) will generally use more rotation, both when breathing in rotation and not breathing in rotation. ”

breathing in rotation breathing while rotating your body from side to side

not breathing in rotation rotating your body from side to side while not breathing

Clive

PS - I was trying to stay with what the original writer was saying, but it now strikes me as somewhat unclearly expressed.

It might make you wonder if you are being told to breathe underwater (ie duringthe body rotation)which is rather difficult. Emotion: stick out tongue

More clearly, I'd say that breathing in rotation means breathing alternately to the left and to the right, ie at the end of each body rotation..

Breathing in non-rotation means breathing only when you are rotated to the right ( or only when rottaed to the left, if you prefer that side. Most swimmers prefer the right).

Mr WordyOh, right. So there are concepts of "breathing rotation" and "non-breathing rotation"?

That's what confused me also, Mr Wordy. I was unaware of these terms.
I can find zero Google hits for "non-breathing rotation"...
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