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You know to what the verb phrase refers?

Is this grammatical, though slightly stilted with the preposition not ending the sentece? I wrote down the following and decided it is correct. Am I right?

You know that which the verb phrase refers to.

You know that, to which the verb phrase refers.

You know that--the verb phrase refers to which (that).
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Comments  
I'm not sure what you are rtying to say, probably: You know what the verb phrase refers to. The first one of your suggestions is technically correct in that that which can indeed sometimes be used instead of what to begin a relative clause. I don't think many native speakers would use that which in a sentence like yours, though.

Let's wait for other opinions!

CB
Hi, CB

I wouldn't write the sentence with that which. I was just trying to break down the sentence so that I could see if the preposition was in the correct place, i.e. before what. Is it in the correct place?

Ta
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English 1b3You know to what the verb phrase refers?
You have a question mark here, and not on any of the others. Are they are supposed to be questions? Or are they all statements? If they are questions, they should all start with Do you know ...

The preposition is properly placed at the end.

You know what the verb phrase refers to. / Do you know what the verb phrase refers to?

All three sentences you placed at the end of your post are anomalous. The first will do in a pinch; the second as well, but without the comma. The last one won't do at all.

CJ
Sorry, there should be no question mark.

Also, the three sentences are not other versions; they are altered versions to help me decide if 'to' in the original is placed correctly before what.

I know the preposition is better at the end of the sentence, but I would like to know if the original is an alternate position. Is it or not?

Thanks
For example:

This is the house in which I live.

To see if in is in the right place, I can figure it out the same way:

This is the house--I live in which (the house).

Sorry, I think only I will understand what I mean here Emotion: sad
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You can put the preposition before its relative pronoun object or at the end of its phrase.

The first sentence in each of the following pairs is the more formal, but most people use the second in ordinary conversation. (that / which) means you can use that or which, but not both -- or no word at all.

Do you see the table on which I put the computer?
or
Do you see the table (that / which) I put the computer on?

This is the house in which I live.
or
This is the house (that / which) I live in.

I finally received the payment for which I have been waiting.
or
I finally received the payment (that / which) I have been waiting for.

The knife with which I cut the meat needs to be sharpened.
or

The knife (that / which) I cut the meat with needs to be sharpened.

This book is the book on which I rely the most.
or
This book is the book (that / which) I rely on the most.

That is not the mixture to which Larry added salt.
or
That is not the mixture (that / which) Larry added salt to.

CJ
Thanks, I'm aware it can precede relative pronouns, but what about with fused relative pronouns, like in my example with 'what'?

Ta
English 1b3what about with fused relative pronouns
OK. I see.

It doesn't work the same in that case. You can only put the preposition at the end of the phrase, not before the fused relative. Remember that initial * means 'ungrammatical'.

That book is what I rely on.
*That book is on what I rely.

What I put the computer on is that table over there.
*On what I put the computer is that table over there.

The knife on the kitchen counter is what I cut the bread with.

*The knife on the kitchen counter is with what I cut the bread.

CJ
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