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Hi there! it's me again! I want to say something like that: " you seems sure of you".

Is it a correct sentence? In french language , what i want to say is" tu as l'air sûre de toi". Thanks in advance.
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Hi,

You seem sure of yourself.

You seem self-confident.

You have an air of self-confidence about you.

Clive
WAW! AM I DREAMING?! you are the BEST!! Thanks again my friend!
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Hi nai6, can I ask you a question? I am often bemused when people insert "lol" apparently randomly and meaninglessly in their sentences. What did you mean by "lol" in "One more translation lol please"?
Yes of course, "lol" means lots of laughs or laughing out loud.It's often used in message by internet. Sorry for my english, every time i try to do my best.

nai6.
nai6Yes of course, "lol" means lots of laughs or laughing out loud.It's often used in message by internet. Sorry for my english, every time i try to do my best.
But why would you be laughing when posting this sensible question?

It is not my intention to criticise your English; this usage is seen from native speakers too. I'm just curious about the thought processes that lie behind it.
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Mr WordyI'm just curious about the thought processes that lie behind it.
If I may butt in at this point --

I would describe "lol" in this case as the nervous laugh of embarrassment. "Here I am again before you, still asking these inane questions. I'm being such a bother."

Whether the questions should be regarded as inane or whether the writer is justified in considering his questions a bother doesn't make the writer's feelings about the situation any less true.

Just my hypothesis. Just my two cents.

Emotion: smile
CJ
CalifJimJust my hypothesis. Just my two cents.
I get the impression that sometimes it's a kind of verbal tic (or whatever the written equivalent is) -- like when some people say "like" after almost every word. I've seen some chat dialogues where practically every line has one or more lols, even when nothing remotely amusing has been said.

(Again, to the OP, I emphasise that it is not my intention to criticise you, just to better understand this neologism.)
Mr WordyI've seen some chat dialogues where practically every line has one or more lols, even when nothing remotely amusing has been said.
I don't do any chatting, so I don't know, but if you want another hypothesis (lol), I think it is a way of making electronic communication more human. The "lol"s replace the smiles and gestures that normally cue the interlocutor that we are generally engaged in the conversation in a cooperative, friendly way. They say, "I'm not just picking your brain robotically, looking only for the dry facts. I'm really a nice, friendly person, and I hope you will see me that way".

The original "laughing out loud" meaning of "lol" has degenerated, if you will, to mere smiles and friendly gestures that might occur in a face-to-face talk between friends.

Emoticons serve the same purpose, by the way.

Of course, the behaviors, gestures, or emotions that emoticons represent differ from culture to culture and person to person, so the frequency of usage of these methods can differ widely depending who you are communicating with.

Again, just my two cents.

CJ
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