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Hi

did I put "only" in the right place?

It will probably come out only next year.

Thanks
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Comments  
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Seems fine to me.
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Thanks!
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I'm glad that you were concerned enough to ask. Only is probably the most often misplaced modifier in the language.
Am I being a devil's advocate here?

Did you mean it will come out next, and next year only? Not this year, and not two years into the future, but one time, and that one time is next year?
Grammar GeekAm I being a devil's advocate here?

Did you mean it will come out next, and next year only? Not this year, and not two years into the future, but one time, and that one time is next year?

Legitimate question, you little devil, you.
I think the use here is the common one of 'at the very least' or 'not until' (the opposite of 'as recently as' [He's dead? I saw him only last week, and he looked fine.].
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I meant "not until"

Thanks
Then I would not use "only."

I think it probably won't be released until next year.

If you must: I think it will only be released next year.

By putting it next to "next year" (in the future) it sounds as though you are restricting its release to next year, and and next year only.

(As Philip said in the past, it emphasizes how recently it happened: It was released only last year, and already it's obsolete.)
Grammar GeekAm I being a devil's advocate here?

Did you mean it will come out next, and next year only? Not this year, and not two years into the future, but one time, and that one time is next year?

You are playing the context's advocate. Emotion: wink
How can you know without context? I am 100% sure that if that sentence comes up in a context (example: a forum about a band, while discussing a new album), not one would have any problems with that sentence. Hopefully, lol. Emotion: smile
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