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Hi,
I'm going to write some sentences and comment on them. I'd like to hear an opinion about my sentences and my comments.
  1. I have only a PC in that little room over there. (Possible but not much used. You have a PC and nothing else in that room)
  2. I have a PC only in that little room over there. (Possible but not much used. You have a PC in that room and nowhere else)
  3. I only have a PC in that little room over there. (Usual one. It could mean whatever you want, depending on where you put the stress)
  1. I also have a PC in that little room over there. (Usual one. It could mean whatever you want, depending on where you put the stress)
  2. I have a PC also in that little room over there. (Not recommended)
  3. I have also a PC in that little room over there. (The worst one! To avoid)

  1. I even have a PC in that little room over there. (Usual one. It could mean whatever you want, depending on where you put the stress)
  2. I have even a PC in that little room over there. (I really don't know? How's this one?)
  3. I have a PC even in that little room over there. (Possible, but not as common as #1. "Even" refers to the little room)
Thank you in advance Emotion: smile
Comments  
KooyeenHi,
I'm going to write some sentences and comment on them. I'd like to hear an opinion about my sentences and my comments.
  1. I have only a PC in that little room over there. (Possible but not much used. You have a PC and nothing else in that room) yes
  2. I have a PC only in that little room over there. (Possible but not much used. You have a PC in that room and nowhere else) yes
  3. I only have a PC in that little room over there. (Usual one. It could mean whatever you want, depending on where you put the stress) yes
  1. I also have a PC in that little room over there. (Usual one. It could mean whatever you want, depending on where you put the stress) means you have more than one PC, one of which is in the little room
  2. I have a PC also in that little room over there. (Not recommended) yes
  3. I have also a PC in that little room over there. (The worst one! To avoid) yes

  1. I even have a PC in that little room over there. (Usual one. It could mean whatever you want, depending on where you put the stress) yes
  2. I have even a PC in that little room over there. (I really don't know? How's this one?) same as 2:1 above - more than one PC
  3. I have a PC even in that little room over there. (Possible, but not as common as #1. "Even" refers to the little room) yes
Thank you in advance Emotion: smile
I see, thank you very much.

How strange anyway... I thought "only" was the only one that was flexible and could be put in all those positions. But you would also consider correct all the examples about "even".
Maybe I'm just not used to those versions, they sound so unusual to me...
Emotion: smile
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Well, sorry, but I still have some doubts... Emotion: smile I'll post here since it's related to this thread.
Which ones are good? Which ones are best?

This can only be found in unofficial RPM packages.
This can be found only in unofficial RPM packages.

This can even be found in unofficial RPM packages.
This can be found even in unofficial RPM packages.

This is only found in unofficial RPM packages.
This is found only in unofficial RPM packages.

This is even found in unofficial RPM packages.
This is found even in unofficial RPM packages.


Thank you in advance. Emotion: smile
They are all fine. Only the emphasis changes.

The underlying position is just before the constituent being modified -- before the prepositional phrase in these cases. If you leave it there, there is greater emphasis on that phrase, and the tendency is to stress the only or even with the voice. In some cases, this word order has a tendency to sound pedantic. This is found ONLY in unofficial ...

Most of the time, however, we move only or even to the left, placing it after the first operator (between subject and verb if there's no operator). In its new position there is less emphasis on the constituent originally modified because it is now modifying from a greater distance. Yet, this is the most natural word order, so, from the viewpoint of transformational grammar, you might say that this left movement is a "nearly obligatory" transform.

I have only ten minutes to finish this. (To emphasize ten minutes.)
I only have ten minutes to finish this. (Usual word order.)

-- Did you see Joan and Sherry?
-- I saw only Joan.
(To be quite precise. Such statements can sound like papal pronunciamentos.)
-- I only saw Joan.
(Usual.)

Note: I saw even Joan is quite strange. It would nearly always be said I even saw Joan.

In this pair there is very little difference to my ear:

This plant will bloom even during a mild winter. (Focuses slightly more on the timing of bloom.)
This plant will even bloom during a mild winter. (Usual. Focuses slightly more on the marvelous property of the plant.)

Nevertheless, there are also cases where the left movement is not a good idea.

I saw them only yesterday. (You can argue that only has a different meaning here.)
I only saw them yesterday. (This could be a transform of I saw only them yesterday. You can argue that left movement should not be done if it makes the origin of the item ambiguous.)

The topics of only, also, and evenare huge, in case you haven't noticed. In a few posts we can barely scratch the surface. Emotion: smile

CJ
Thank you very much Jim, your post really helped me a lot.
CalifJim The topics of only, also, and evenare huge, in case you haven't noticed. In a few posts we can barely scratch the surface. Emotion: smile

You are right, unfortunately. Emotion: smile But now I think this problem only exists in writing.
I think in writing we tend to move "only" and "even" because we want to be sure we are emphasizing the right part in a sentence. But as you said, the usual word order is "I only saw John" or "This is only found in...", and the other ways don't sound as good as the usual way. That bothered me, I simply thought the sentences were not clear enough. But one day I started to focus a little more on "intonation" and, well, I started to realize that stress and intonation are so important! So I think that when people want to say...
There's a PC only in my room
...they just say...
There's only a PC in my room (stress on "room")

In writing, we have the problem that without hearing the stress and intonation, sentences like that can sometimes be abiguous.

Thank you again for your help Emotion: smile
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stress and intonation are so important!
Yes, yes, yes!!! I think this is what makes English unique among European languages. It has a different sort of "music" to it -- so much of the meaning can depend on the intonation of a word or phrase.
thanks to everybody