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Which is the best and why?

a. I do not think many people would feel there is a difference, but that one is more familiar to them than the other.

b. I do not think many people would feel there is a difference, only that one is more familiar to them than the other.

c. I do not think many people would feel there is a difference, only one is more familiar to them than the other.

d. I do not think many people would feel there is a difference-- only that one is more familiar to them than the other.

e. I do not think many people would feel that there is a difference, but/only that one is more familiar to them than the other.

Thanks
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I would use D: it solves the dilemma.
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Mister Micawberit solves the dilemma.

Sorry, but could you please share the dilemma you see? I don't see it Emotion: crying
By using the more casual m-dash, we don't have to worry about the idea of 'only' being a conjunction or a conjunctive adjunct or whatever (B, E), and we don't have to wrestle with the possible accusation of creating a comma-splice fragment (C).
Mister Micawberwe don't have to wrestle with the possible accusation of creating a comma-splice fragment (C).

Since the omission of 'that' in the earlier noun clause is acceptable (would feel that there is a difference), I thought it would be OK in the following noun clause also. Is it not acceptable to omit 'that' in the second noun clause because it looks like a comma splice?
Mister Micawberwe don't have to worry about the idea of 'only' being a conjunction or a conjunctive adjunct or whatever (B, E),
My dictionary says 'only' can function as a conjunction, with the meaning of 'but.' Is there disagreement about its use as a conjunction perhaps? What is a conjunctive adjunct?
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As I said, I would choose D to avoid these considerations.