re: Oogo Chavez page 2

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The Japanese internment was strictly caused by the war with Japan and it was a California/west coast thing

Yes, Ray. Or didn't "early '40s" put it into the right era.

The early 1940s , yes, 41 to be exact. but it had no connection to the dust bowl, migrant workers or anything other than the war.
They instead the Spanish

Don't they sing jolly "Alouetta" (sp?) -type songs in French ... a marching song. I since learned it was spelled "jolie".

We sang about frenchies dancing on a bridge."Sur le Pont D'Avingon, l'on y danse l'on y danse" {damn but I hate that song}

Frere Jacques.
Au pres de ma blonde, il fait bon.
Seems to me there was some rock-a-bye cradle song, too, but I have STS from Jolie Allouette.
A drinking song that was introduced to me in a beer barn as an undergraduate:
Chevalier de la table ronde, ditez moi si le vin est bon.

Spelling. . .I never saw most of these in lyric form, and am just guessing.
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U.S. newsreaders always called Charles de Gaulle "Charlz," not "Sharl." They gave his given name its American pronunciation. But they ... Hispanics and their culture. I remember the jolly "buenos amigos"-type songs in Mrs. Wojciechowski's 9th-grade Spanish class back in Detroit,

Say, what high school did you go to? Ours didn't have a Mrs. Wojciechowski; I learned Spanish from a Mrs. Brennan, who also taught Latin and French. (And I unlearned most of it by the method of not using it. Foolish, that.)
La Cucaracha, anyone? What a let-down to find out, in Spanish class, what "cucaracha" meant. The song just wasn't the same after that.

Maria
Should have been "goutez-moi", I think.
La Cucaracha, anyone? What a let-down to find out, in Spanish class, what "cucaracha" meant. The song just wasn't the same after that.

I know what you mean.
I didn't take Spanish, only knew about 8 words when I got to the border in Texas, but learned it on the road. I don't remember it coming up in conversation, or in a movie with subtitles. I think it was in a glossary or maybe at a museum.
Maria

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for some reason, remove NOPSAM :-)
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U.S. newsreaders always called Charles de Gaulle "Charlz," not "Sharl." They gave his given name its American pronunciation. But they ... is that Americans have always hated the French, even when they came and saved our sorry asses during the Revolution.

My theory is that in de Gaulle's time, most newscasters were simply reading the news, now we have live video from the country of origin and it's easy to verify the approximately-correct pronunciation.

(Email Removed) is Joshua Putnam

Braze your own bicycle frames. See
La Cucaracha, anyone? What a let-down to find out, in Spanish class, what "cucaracha" meant. The song just wasn't the same after that.

I know what you mean. I didn't take Spanish, only knew about 8 words when I got to the border ... in conversation, or in a movie with subtitles. I think it was in a glossary or maybe at a museum.

So how many words (in Spanish) do you know now? (Just wondering.)

Maria
It was a bus-traveling song, and a marching song. I since learned it was spelled "jolie".

And those songs from school triggered a lot of parodies.

Alouette smoked a cigarette
Chewed tobacca, spit it on the floor.
Along came her mumma, kicked her on the bum-a
Now she's not allowed to smoke it any more.
As for "Mademoiselle d'Armentières", the less said the better.
A drinking song that was introduced to me in a beer barn as an undergraduate: Chevalier de la table ronde, ditez moi si le vin est bon.

Ne dites pas "disez", disez "dites".

Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org

Please note the changed e-mail and web addresses. The domain eepjm.newcastle.edu.au no longer exists, and I can no longer receive mail at my newcastle.edu.au addresses. The optusnet address could disappear at any time.
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La Cucaracha, anyone? What a let-down to find out, in Spanish class, what "cucaracha" meant. The song just wasn't the same after that.

The song was never about the little beast that we all know and hate. "La Cucaracha" was the name given to a vehicle, belonging to one of the Central American revolutionaries - I think it was Pancho Villa - that kept needing a push because it kept breaking down. That's why the song says that La Cucaracha "ya no puede caminar".
If you're having trouble working out why a car would be named after an insect, just think of the VW Beetle.

Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org

Please note the changed e-mail and web addresses. The domain eepjm.newcastle.edu.au no longer exists, and I can no longer receive mail at my newcastle.edu.au addresses. The optusnet address could disappear at any time.
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