U.S. newsreaders always called Charles de Gaulle "Charlz," not "Sharl." They gave his given name its American pronunciation.
But they almost always call Venezuelan firebrand Hugo Chavez "Oogo," instead of the American "Hyoogo."
My theory about this is that Americans have always hated the French, even when they came and saved our sorry asses during the Revolution.

But Americans have always loved Hispanics and their culture. I remember the jolly "buenos amigos"-type songs in Mrs. Wojciechowski's 9th-grade Spanish class back in Detroit, and the merry old Disney cartoons depicting the Latino flair for song, dance, and siestas. So we Americans are keen to replicate Spanish pronunciation in our English. In fact, we'd make everything bilingual in this country if we could.
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U.S. newsreaders always called Charles de Gaulle "Charlz," not "Sharl." They gave his given name its American pronunciation. But they almost always call Venezuelan firebrand Hugo Chavez "Oogo," instead of the American "Hyoogo."

I haven't noticed "Oogo" being used on a frequent basis. I am wondering how you can tell what readers are saying? Oh, are you saying "readers" in the sense of TV newspeople? Granted, many of them are reading their reports. I think I would judge US aptitude and love for certain pronunciations by how the less familiar languages are pronounced. For example, Chinese, Thai and Arab names and places.
My theory about this is that Americans have always hated the French, even when they came and saved our sorry asses during the Revolution.

Well, that's your theory. I don't subscribe. After all, there is a consuming interest in all things fashionable to worship French taste.

I believe that some our scorn for French manners is a reaction to snobbery, on the one hand, and an offended machismo, which labels the French as effete. That is the same machismo that insists on the rugged frontiersman ethic, a "go it alone into the wilderness", and a need to have the upper hand over all others. Diplomacy? Many of the reactionaries are having a good hack at the UN, now that they have vanquished the social welfare state.
But Americans have always loved Hispanics and their culture. I remember the jolly "buenos amigos"-type songs in Mrs. Wojciechowski's 9th-grade ... keen to replicate Spanish pronunciation in our English. In fact, we'd make everything bilingual in this country if we could.

Yu know, there is a movement afoot to make English the official language, and to save a lot of money on the printing of official documents in English only. (Let our new immigrants learn our language, just the way my parents, grandparents, etc. have done.)

No one was threatened by the Hispanic culture in the '20s and '30s, especially when the trend-setters could go flying off to Havana, Rio and all those other fashionable places the rest of us only saw in the movies. Many of the dances were imported at that time and are now being revived as the latest fad on TV.
We have to prove that we love Iberic cultures, so that we can continue to scorn and undermine the governments that those same cultures raise up. And, of course, we must be terribly afraid of Cuba, which may, at any moment, rise up and invade US.
"The Grammer Genious" wrote in messagenews:[email protected]

I guess you didn't know that thousands of Mexicans were forcefully deported from Los Angeles in the 1930s.
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U.S. newsreaders always called Charles de Gaulle "Charlz," not "Sharl." They gave his given name its American pronunciation. But they almost always call Venezuelan firebrand Hugo Chavez "Oogo," instead of the American "Hyoogo."

Actually, I have heard it said more like "hoogo". Maybe it depends on who you go and listen to?
Maybe this is just an exaple of changing times? If he was on the news in the forties, they would have called him "hyoogo", and if De Gaul was doing things now perhaps they would say "Sharles"?
"The Grammer Genious" wrote in messagenews:[email protected] I haven't noticed ... which may, at any moment, rise up and invade US.

I guess you didn't know that thousands of Mexicans were forcefully deported from Los Angeles in the 1930s.

Well, that isn't something I have heard about, no. Can you let me know where I can search and read about it?
You see, that was the period in which many US dust bowl refugees fled their homes for the fruit farms of the California farm regions. I understand the camp bosses and contractors may have colluded to favor certain prospective employers. I have heard of some dust-ups between migrant workers of all sorts out there, to be followed by the internment of Nisei in the early '40s.
U.S. newsreaders always called Charles de Gaulle "Charlz," not "Sharl." They gave his given name its American pronunciation. But they ... Americans have always loved Hispanics and their culture. I remember the jolly "buenos amigos"-type songs in Mrs. Wojciechowski's 9th-grade Spanish

Don't they sing jolly "Alouetta" (sp?) -type songs in French class?
class back in Detroit, and the merry old Disney cartoons depicting the Latino flair for song, dance, and siestas. So we Americans are keen to replicate Spanish pronunciation in our English. In fact, we'd make everything bilingual in this country if we could.

How do you reconcile that with the news's pronunciation of Pinochet, which most have for years repeatedly pronounced as if it were French, Peenoshay. Sounds like a wine.
Even NPR which does better than most said Peenoshet as often as the correct pronunciation, which is of course as it is spelled, using a Spanish "i", Peenochet.
They seem to be dissing the Spanish here and promoting the French. Maybe it's not so easy to reach big conclusions from 2 or 3 little factoids.
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I guess you didn't know that thousands of Mexicans were forcefully deported from Los Angeles in the 1930s.

Well, that isn't something I have heard about, no. Can you let me know where I can search and read ... between migrant workers of all sorts out there, to be followed by the internment of Nisei in the early '40s.

The Japanese internment was strictly caused by the war with Japan and it was a California/west coast thing
.Earl Warren the then Governor of Cal was the man who pushed for it.
U.S. newsreaders always called Charles de Gaulle "Charlz," not "Sharl."They ... I rememberthe jolly "buenos amigos"-type songs in Mrs. Wojciechowski's 9th-gradeSpanish

Don't they sing jolly "Alouetta" (sp?) -type songs in French class?

We sang about frenchies dancing on a bridge."Sur le Pont D'Avingon, l'on y danse l'on y danse"
{damn but I hate that song}
Well, that isn't something I have heard about, no. Can ... followed by the internment of Nisei in the early '40s.

The Japanese internment was strictly caused by the war with Japan and it was a California/west coast thing

Yes, Ray. Or didn't "early '40s" put it into the right era.
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