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"The purpose of the present paper is twofold. First, to examine what beliefs, if any, underlie (a) the Pyrrhonist’s desire for ataraxia and his account of how this state may be attained, and (b) his philanthropic therapy, which seeks to induce by argument epoche and ataraxia in the Dogmatists. Second, to determine whether the Pyrrhonist’s philanthropia and his search for and attainment of ataraxia are, as scholars have generally believed, essential aspects of his stance. The analysis of these issues will let us both better understand the nature of the Pyrrhonean outlook and assess its coherence. This is important especially because Pyrrhonism is a philosophy that may still be found attractive and worth adopting."

I'm not sure about the emboldened sentences.

Best,

Sextus
Comments  
I think the sentences are clear and grammatically correct.
What if I replace 'let' by 'allow':

"The analysis of these issues will let allows us to both better understand the nature of the Pyrrhonean outlook and assess its coherence."

Is this ok, or should I rather say: "The analysis of these issues will allow us both to better understand the nature of the Pyrrhonean outlook and to assess its coherence." ?

Sextus
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It's a fine point. I would stay with the original ... will let us both ... for the not very significant reason that let is shorter than allow and does not take to. The sentence is fairly substantial, and let gives you a little simplification.

PS
I assume you know that ...will let allows us to... is not correct.
Sorry that I wrote "will let allows us to". I forgot to delete "let".

And yep, I know that it isn't correct to say "let us to".

Thanks for your reply.

Sextus
I've been thinking, and I'd be interested in finding out where to place "to" in case I use "allow". I'll post this in a different thread.

Best,

Sextus
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