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Hi, I am reading Alice in Wonderland in Engish and I have found the phrase: "this was not a VERY good opportunity for showing off her knowledge."

I assume that "this was not a VERY good opportunity to show off her knowledge" would be also ok.

According to a dictionary, "this was not a VERY good opportunity of showing off her knowledge" could be fine (maybe.)

Which prepositions would English natives most frequently use for "opportunity," among "to ()", "for ()", and "of ()"?

And why do they choose that specific one rather than other options?

Thanks.
Comments  
Both are used, and the tendency is this:

"this was not a VERY good opportunity for showing off her knowledge."-- A simple observation that the moment appears opportune.

"this was not a VERY good opportunity to show off her knowledge"--The speaker is considering taking (or rather, not taking) advantage of the opportunity.
Hi,

Thank you for helping me.

What do you think about "opportunity of ~ing"?
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Don't think so. "The opportunity of a lifetime" is quite common, but that doesn't tell us what the opportunity is.

You often hear, "She gave me the opportunity of taking her home." I don't think "for" would work here, so I guess I'll have to recant my first remark.
Of course we could use the infinitive, "She gave me the opportunity to take her home." The meaning is a little different here. With "to," I might decline. IMHO, using "of" implies that I availed myself of the opportunity.
I'm not comfortable with "This was not a very good opportunity of showing off her knowledge."
I'd be happy with "This was not a very good example of showing off her knowledge."

The difference seems to be that "of" refers to the performance of the act rather than the anticipation of it.
Thank you, Avangi.

If my understanding is correct, "she gave me the opportunity of taking her home" implies "I actually took advantage of the opportunity she gave me (not arrogantly, in a natural way) to take her home." Meanwhile, "she gave me the opportunity to take her home" implies "she gave the permission for me to take her home, but I have not yet decide on it." Is it correct?
Yes, that's the way I understand it.
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Thank you! I think I have understood how to use "opportunity."

You and people on this site are wonderful.
I don't mean to suggest that the use of "to" precludes your having accepted.
It's just that using "of" is more likely to be thought of as a done deal.

Speaking in simple past, you may say,
"She gave me the opportunity to take her home, and I subsequently accepted."
"She gave me the opportunity to take her home, and I subsequently declined."

It's not set in concrete. It's just the way we usually think of it.

You could use "to" and mean that you accepted.
But the person you're telling this to may well ask, "Well? - And did you?"

You'd be much less likely to use "of" and mean that you didn't take her home.

[Z][X] Emotion: smile
I have checked this website just now.

Thank you for the addtional comment!

>You'd be much less likely to use "of" and mean that you didn't take her home.

I got it. this explanation is very clear and easy to memorize.

Thank you again:)

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