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Are these correct? If not, why? What do they mean?
1. Lucky my employees didn't park here or else I would have to drive upstairs.
2. Lucky my employees didn't park here or else I will have to drive upstairs.

3. Lucky my employees don't park here or else I would have to drive upstairs.
4. Lucky my employees don't park here or else I will have to drive upstairs.

Thanks in advance.
Comments  
Jack, you are building Conditional type II sentences (present non-factual):

(1) Correct. There are no other cars in the lot; he does not have to drive farther.
(2) Meaningless. Conditional 'would' is required.
(3) Correct. Employees do not, as a habit or by command, use this lotg; he does not have to drive farther.
(4) Meaningless. Conditional 'would' is required.
Shouldn't he say "luckily" instead of "lucky" (lucky is adj. and adv. is needed)
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Formally, yes, Maverick-- but using 'lucky' here is a common colloquialism.
Is there something strange about #1?

1. 'Lucky my employees didn't park here or else I would have to drive upstairs.'

~ 'It's lucky my employees didn't park here. Otherwise I would have had to drive upstairs.'

~ 'Luckily my employees didn't park here. Otherwise I would have had to drive upstairs.'

~ 'If my employees had parked here, I would have had to drive upstairs.'

Or does he say #1 just after he's parked his car; but the ~ versions as he locks the car door and walks away?

MrP
I see what you mean, but-- 'If they had parked here this morning, I would have found the spaces all full when I pulled in (a moment ago), and I would now have to drive upstairs.' I think he's still in the car, entering the lot.

The simple past of course led me to presume the 'would' conditional, but perhaps it is more complex than that.
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Ah yes, I see – inserting the 'now' does it.