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 Hi teachers

ae these sentences correct:
You or I am going to go
Neither he nor I am going to go
Either you or I am going to go 

It's said that the verb(to be) is determined by the nearest subject, but do the above sentences sound awkward ?
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Comments  
 any help from the teachers?
Hi, Anewcomer,

I'm not a teacher but what I think of this is that the verbs (to be) are in a correct form, but the combination "to be going to go" is a tautology. Usually, you don't use "to go" after "to be going to", i.e.:

I'm going to a library but NOT I'm going to go to a library.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
You (are going to go) or I am going to go.
The same is the story with the other two.
Hi Anewcomer
Yes, when the subject contains 'or', it is normally the word closest to the verb that determines the verb form.
The use of "be going to go" is quite common. It is simply the be going to future of the verb 'go'.
 Thanks for the replies
Ok, so it's grammatical to say You or I am telling him, uh it sounds odd but well, it's grammatical anyway 

Thanks 
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They all sound odd to me, very odd. I'm surprised to hear that Amy findthem acceptable. Amy, do you really think you would say them that way,or that people would say them that way? I'm afraid I wouldn't evenunderstand if I heard something like "You or I am going to die"... I would be like "You what?".
So I would use "is":

(Either) you or I is going to die.
Either me or you is going to die. I hope it's you.
Neither you nor I are responsible. (also "is")

I'm a not native speaker, so I can't be 100% sure, but I'm sure this stuff is really complicated and it's difficult to find out what native speakers really say, because it's a secret ESL learners are not supposed to know, LOL.
KooyeenThey all sound odd to me, very odd. I'm surprised to hear that Amy findthem acceptable. Amy, do you really think you would say them that way,or that people would say them that way? I'm afraid I wouldn't evenunderstand if I heard something like "You or I am going to die"... I would be like "You what?".
So I would use "is":

(Either) you or I is going to die.
Either me or you is going to die. I hope it's you.
Neither you nor I are responsible. (also "is")

I'm a not native speaker, so I can't be 100% sure, but I'm sure this stuff is really complicated and it's difficult to find out what native speakers really say, because it's a secret ESL learners are not supposed to know, LOL.

Hi Kooyeen
(Either) you or I am going to die.
Either I or you are going to die. (Normally, "I" should be placed last. So Either you or I am going to die.)
Neither you nor I am responsible.

Note: Follow the proximity rule.

Yoong LiatEither) you or I am going to die.
Either I or you are going to die. (Normally, "I" should be placed last. So Either you or I am going to die.)
Neither you nor I am responsible.
Note: Follow the proximity rule.
Hi Yoong,
yeah, I know that rule, but I don't think it works in every case. I sure find those sentences odd, and I'm afraid most native speakers would not say them either. So what's the purpose of a rule who leads to weird English? Emotion: smile
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