Researching my family history I recently discovered that an ancestor of mine, first name "John" married in Godalming, Surrey, on 5th December 1596 a young lady, Elizabeth PLONKER. (Yes, the jokes are predictable..)

The LDS website shows the PLONKER surname disappearing about mid-1600s...

Does anyone have a view on the earliest occurrence of "PLONKER" in the modern, "Only Fools & Horses" sense of "Rodney you PLONKER, or what the origin was ???
NB For non-UK readers... "Only Fools & Horses" was a TV programme...

Yours aye
TIA
Rab
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Researching my family history I recently discovered that an ancestor of mine, first name "John" married in Godalming, Surrey, on ... of "PLONKER" in the modern, "Only Fools & Horses" sense of "Rodney you PLONKER, or what the origin was ???

The earliest quote for that sense in the supplement to OED1 is as recent as 1966.
There's a 19th-century dialect meaning, though, for something large and substantial, and a quote from 1861 applies it to a thick piece of cloth: that might be the source.

Cheers, Harvey
Canadian (30 years) and British (23 years)
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Researching my family history I recently discovered that an ancestor of mine, first name "John" married in Godalming, Surrey, on ... of "PLONKER" in the modern, "Only Fools & Horses" sense of "Rodney you PLONKER, or what the origin was ???

I came across the word referring to a condom (probably used) but I don't know where the reference was - almost certainly post WWII.

Of course, this may be essentially the same as the OF&H usage, given that words which were originally considered quite offensive gradually lose their virulence as the memory of the original meaning fades.

Examples of this include berk and dork.
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On 31 Aug 2005, Rab C Nesbitt wrote

Researching my family history I recently discovered that an ancestor ... of "Rodney you PLONKER, or what the origin was ???

The earliest quote for that sense in the supplement to OED1 is as recent as 1966. There's a 19th-century dialect meaning, though, for something large and substantial, and a quote from 1861 applies it to a thick piece of cloth: that might be the source.

I get the impression that comedies like to have catch-phrase expletives that sound obscene but are actually too meaningless to attract complaints - the "Naff" of Porridge and "Feck" of Father Ted.
Phil C.
On 31 Aug 2005, Rab C Nesbitt wrote The earliest ... a thick piece of cloth: that might be the source.

I get the impression that comedies like to have catch-phrase expletives that sound obscene but are actually too meaningless to attract complaints - the "Naff" of Porridge and "Feck" of Father Ted. Phil C.

Gosh: "Naff" is fairly old, I think...
* naff - Origin unknown, various theories; naff may perh. be &

=
Entry from OED Online
naff, a. DRAFT REVISION June 2003
Brit. colloq.
Forms: 19- naff, (rare) naph. (Origin unknown (see note below). Prob. unrelated to slightly earlier NAFF v.
Various theories have been proposed as to the origin of this word. It has been suggested that it is (in Polari slang: see PARLYAREE n.)
1967 B. TOOK & M. FELDMAN Round the Horne (1975) 113 Sandy. He had anexperience in Bognor didn't you Jule. Julian. Yes. Very naff it was. (Cf. p. 12: Camp Chat... Naph = Bad.)
One of the most popular theories is the suggestion that the word is perh. an acronym either O.E.D. Suppl. (1976) compares the earlier English regional (northern) forms naffhead, naffin, naffy, all denoting a simpleton or idiot (see Eng. Dial. Dict. s.v. Naff v.), and also NIFF-NAFF n., NIFFY-NAFFY a., and NYAFF n., NYAFF v.)
Unfashionable, vulgar; lacking in style, inept; worthless, faulty.
1966 B. TOOK & M. FELDMAN in B. Took Best of 'Round the Horne' (1989) 156,I couldn't be doing with a garden like this... I mean all them horrible little naff gnomes. 1970 Sunday Tel. (Brisbane) 22 Feb. 92/1, I have been to no less than three parties in the past two weeks which rejoiced in the naffest bit of social intercourse it has been my misfortune to witness. 1982 L. CODY Bad Company ii. 13 No electricity... I think it's just a naff battery connection. 1983 Sunday Tel. 21 Aug. 11/3 It is naff to call your house The Gables, Mon Repos, or Dunroamin'. 2000 J. OWEN in J. Adams et al. Girls' Night In 178 Mistake naff trompe l'oeil on wall for real doorway and walk straight into it.

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On 31 Aug 2005, Rab C Nesbitt wrote

I get the impression that comedies like to have catch-phrase expletives that sound obscene but are actually too meaningless to attract complaints - the "Naff" of Porridge and "Feck" of Father Ted. Phil C.

"Feck" is a common variant of "" in Ireland. It is a bit less vulgar but still may cause offence. Its use predates Father Ted by a long way. There is a town near here called "Feckenham", English people tend to think it an unremarkable name but my father, who is Irish, finds it hilarious. =20

Se=E1n O'Leathl=F3bhair
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I get the impression that comedies like to have catch-phrase ... of Porridge and "Feck" of Father Ted. Phil C.

"Feck" is a common variant of "" in Ireland.

As is "fook" as in "The fookin' t'ing won't work now, will it."
It is a bit less vulgar but still may cause offence. Its use predates Father Ted by a long way. ... called "Feckenham", English people tend to think it an unremarkable name but my father, who is Irish, finds it hilarious.

Tony Cooper
Orlando, FL
I get the impression that comedies like to have catch-phrase ... - the "Naff" of Porridge and "Feck" of Father Ted.

"Feck" is a common variant of "" in Ireland. It is a bit less vulgar but still may cause offence. ... called "Feckenham", English people tend to think it an unremarkable name but my father, who is Irish, finds it hilarious.

But it's pronounced Faykenham, so the sound isn't the same.

David
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At 13:48:21 on Wed, 31 Aug 2005, Seán O'Leathlóbhair (Email Removed) wrote in
"Feck" is a common variant of "" in Ireland. It is a bit less vulgar but still may cause offence. ... called "Feckenham", English people tend to think it an unremarkable name but my father, who is Irish, finds it hilarious.

I used to giggle over French placenames such as Caen and St Lot, until I realised that the French probably also giggled over Kent.
Molly Mockford
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