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I have a few questions here:

1. She is as pretty as other/ the other girls you've met before.

He easily gets distracted by other/ the other students.

Some girls are beautiful, others/ the others are just plain-looking.

2. Please check the box at /on the left on the computer.

3. When do you use a singular noun after any? Could you please give me some examples?

4. Do you put a plural noun or a singular noun after any other?

5. Are the following sentences correct?

1. I invited him to come over.

2. A: How are you gonna get here?

B: I will drive a car over C:I will take a bus over.

3. He is going to move over/ over there.

4. Do you want me to walk you over?

Could you please explain to me how to use over here?

I'm also a little confused with when to use other or the other..

Really appreciate you for your explanation.
Comments  
Hi, David.

1. She is as pretty as other/ the other girls you've met before. -- both OK (the is OK if the speaker presumes the listener has met girls previously)

He easily gets distracted by other/ the other students. -- both OK (the is OK if the context is a class they are already talking about).

Some girls are beautiful, others are just plain-looking. -- No the.

2. Please check the box at /on the left on the computer. -- Both OK. Of the computer?

3. When do you use a singular noun after any? Could you please give me some examples? -- Usually, some stress is required: 'I don't have any friend at all in Toledo'.

4. Do you put a plural noun or a singular noun after any other? -- Same guideline as for #3 above.

5. Are the following sentences correct?

1. I invited him to come over. -- OK

2. A: How are you gonna get here? -- OK

B: I will drive a car over -- OK C:I will take a bus over. -- OK

3. He is going to move over/ over there. -- OK

4. Do you want me to walk you over? -- OK

Could you please explain to me how to use over here? -- There is away from the speaker; here is near the speaker. 'Come over here so that I can hit you'.

I'm also a little confused with when to use other or the other.. -- Use the when there is a specific or previously mentioned other; the rule is no different from that for the alone.
Thank you so much for answering my questions

So if someone says, "I want to move to SF."

Would it be ok if I ask, "When do you want to move over?"

I also got a question about over

Can I say, "Pass the book over to her?"

Thanks loads!
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So if someone says, "I want to move to SF." Would it be ok if I ask, "When do you want to move over?" -- No. 'Move' only.

Can I say, "Pass the book over to her?" -- OK. Remember that 'over' has the meaning of distance, and only when it is significant to the situation.
Mister MicawberSo if someone says, "I want to move to SF." Would it be ok if I ask, "When do you want to move over?" -- No. 'Move' only.

Can I say, "Pass the book over to her?" -- OK. Remember that 'over' has the meaning of distance, and only when it is significant to the situation.

1. Over has the meaning of distance, so why can't I say ,"when do you want to move over?"

2. According to what you said, if the person is sitting near or close to me, I cannot say," pass the book over to her/him," right?

Thank you for being so patient answering my questions.

1-- We don't use over because the distance is not germane to the context-- of course, one city is distant from another city, but this fact does not have to be communicated.

2-- 'Cannot say' is the wrong viewpoint: you can say anything you wish. A native speaker would probably not use over if the listener and the book recipient were near each other.
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Let me add one more use, from the vantage of a mother: Hand that over to your sister this instant! (When child A has taken something that belongs to child B.)

The phrase "hand over" means to relinquish, to give to someone else. So you might hear "hand over that book" even if the two people invovled are seated right next to each other. I can't immediately think of other "over" phrases where the distance or relative positioning isn't a factor.