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Could you please help me with this sentence?

- No other school apart from/other than this school asks students to conform to their strict dress code. Since he doesn't do it I'm not going to either.

Could you help me with these 3 sentences?

- Both reports are as long as each other. One report is negative and one report positive/in negative and one in positive. (the numbers in the report are all negative and the other all positive.) how do you say that?

- This battery supports 4 hours of play time. (electronic device)

- You've been talking about your life for days now I know your life as if it was mine. (can you "know someone's life"?)

Thank you
Comments  
Could you please help me with these sentences please?

Thank you
- No other school apart from/other than this school asks students to conform to a strict dress code. Since he doesn't do it I'm not going to either. -- The part I've struck out is self-evident, so there's no need to say it. I don't understand the connection between the two sentences. Did you mean them to be read together?

- Both reports are the same length. One (report) is negative and one / the other (is) positive/in negative and one in positive.

(the numbers in the report are all negative and the other all positive.) how do you say that? -- Are you talking about positive and negative numbers as in "plus five" and "minus five", or does "positive"/"negative" mean "optimistic"/"gloomy"?

- This battery provides 4 hours of play time.

- You've been talking about your life for days now; I know it as if it were/was mine.

(can you "know someone's life"? Yes, it's OK in this kind of context.
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no school other than this one

equally long...one is negative, the other positive

as well as I know mine
In the sentence below, you have already stated the fact, 'no other school', so to then write "apart from/other than this school" is like saying, 'no other school no other school..'

- No other school apart from/other than this school asks students to conform to their strict dress code. Since he doesn't do it I'm not going to either.

No other school asks students to conform to their strict dress code. Since he doesn't do it, (ADD COMMA) I'm not going to either.
or
This is the only school that asks students to conform to their strict dress code. Since he doesn't do it, I'm not going to either.

- Both reports are as long as each other. One report is negative and the other is positive.

- This battery gives/provides 4 hours of playing time.

- You've been talking about your life for days now. (FULL STOP) I know your life as if it were mine.

(When we use the Conditional as in the form in your sentence, the speaker is also indicating whether he regards the possibility as possible for him. Two people can't switch lives, and whilst I can suggest, I know you like I know myself, your life cannot be mine -and vice versa. We indicate this by using the Past tense form, 'were'.

Similarly:
"If I were you, I wouldn't go."
But how many times will you hear "If I was you..." - from people who come out with "I seen him..." - and one middle class lady on the Judge Judy show the other day who came out with "I had caughten him taking..."
Hello Mr Wordy,

I was trying to say that one report is at plus 5 and one -5. How would you say it then. and what if it was gloomy and optimistic, how would you say it then?

Thank you
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alc24I was trying to say that one report is at plus 5 and one -5. How would you say it then.
If the context was clear and everyone already knew what you were talking about, you could just say "one report is at plus five and the other at minus five". Most times, though, it would be clearer to explain the meaning of the number; e.g. "This report forecasts an increase of five percent, and the other forecasts a decrease of five percent".
alc24
and what if it was gloomy and optimistic, how would you say it then?

Those words are OK to use.
Thanks. However, it would also have been useful to show how "apart from / other than" could have been used here.

That can be done by striking out the "other" after "No":

No school apart from / other than this one... (Note that I have also replaced the second "school" with "one")

It can be helpful to understand the different possible ways to express an idea (like learning about various routes for getting from A to B). As with roads, one may like to choose sentence structure according to situation.

Another point: The next sentence says, "Since he doesn't do it I'm not going to either".

It's not clear who the word "he" refers to, and what it is that "he" doesn't "do". I suppose one has to assume that this sentence refers not to its immediate predecessor but to something that has already been discussed earlier.