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Hi!

Could some native speaker please comment on my remarks and questions below? Beware: serious nitpicking ahead. Emotion: wink

Steve plays chess.

a) So do I.
b) Me too.

Steve doesn't play chess.

a) Neither do I.
b) Me neither.

Questions:

1) Will I sound too formal if I use the a) choices in everyday speech?

2) Is me neither more informal than me too? I think so.

3) When can I replace me too and me neither with same here? I've heard it is not possible in every context, especially as a substitute for me neither.

4) I think that same here is the most informal expression out of all those mentioned here. Am I right?

5) Can I use "likewise" as a substite for me too / me neither? If so, when?

6) What about me as well and the same goes for me as substitutes for so + AUX + I? I guess the latter would be somewhat limited in its usage: I can imagine "the same goes for me" after "Steve likes chess" but not after "Steve plays chess".

7) What if I want to speak about a person other than me? What can I use instead of, say, So does my sister?

My sister too / as well ???
My sister does too / as well ???
The same goes for my sister ??? (if correct, its usage seems limited to me again)

...and instead of Neither does my sister? My sister neither? My sister does neither? My sister doesn't either? Emotion: wink

Thank you in advance for your patience.
Comments  
PastsimpleHi!

Could some native speaker please comment on my remarks and questions below? Beware: serious nitpicking ahead. Emotion: wink

Steve plays chess.

a) So do I.correct
b) Me too.o.k., but not very formal

Steve doesn't play chess.

a) Neither do I.Same as a) and b) above
b) Me neither.

Questions:

1) Will I sound too formal if I use the a) choices in everyday speech?No.

2) Is me neither more informal than me too? I think so.I'd say they are equally abrasive.

3) When can I replace me too and me neither with same here? I've heard it is not possible in every context, especially as a substitute for me neither.

4) I think that same here is the most informal expression out of all those mentioned here. Am I right? Very casual

5) Can I use "likewise" as a substite for me too / me neither? If so, when?Very casual

6) What about me as well and the same goes for me as substitutes for so + AUX + I? I guess the latter would be somewhat limited in its usage: I can imagine "the same goes for me" after "Steve likes chess" but not after "Steve plays chess". Can be used.

7) What if I want to speak about a person other than me? What can I use instead of, say, So does my sister?

My sister too / as well ???
My sister does too / as well ???
The same goes for my sister ??? (if correct, its usage seems limited to me again)

...and instead of Neither does my sister?My sister neither? My sister does neither? My sister doesn't either? Emotion: winkThis is correct.

Thank you in advance for your patience.

I wouldn't use the informal or casual in formal writing unless as a direct quote.
1) Will I sound too formal if I use the a) choices in everyday speech? No, not at all.

2) Is me neither more informal than me too? I think so. No, not at all.

3) When can I replace me too and me neither with same here? I've heard it is not possible in every context, especially as a substitute for me neither. I don't know what kind of context would disallow the substitution.

4) I think that same here is the most informal expression out of all those mentioned here. Am I right? Yes, you are.

5) Can I use "likewise" as a substite for me too / me neither? If so, when? Yes, but I hardly ever hear it.

6) What about me as well and the same goes for me as substitutes for so + AUX + I? I guess the latter would be somewhat limited in its usage: I can imagine "the same goes for me" after "Steve likes chess" but not after "Steve plays chess". I almost never hear me as well. You imagine correctly. Usually the same goes for me is stated as a way of indicating that you share an opinion (or desire or need) with the person who just expressed one. It may be a substitute for I think so too.

7) What if I want to speak about a person other than me? What can I use instead of, say, So does my sister?

My sister too / as well ??? OK
My sister does too / as well ??? OK
The same goes for my sister ??? (if correct, its usage seems limited to me again) Rarely heard.

...and instead of Neither does my sister? My sister neither? Possible. My sister does neither? No -- Neither does my sister is what you need here. My sister doesn't either? Fine.

CJ
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Thanks for your answers. It's now completely clear.
Could you please have a look at the following sentences?

Steve must do it. ---> So must I.
Steve has to do it. ---> So do I.
Steve has a car. ---> So do I.
Steve has got a car. (BrE) ---> So have I.

Steve mustn't do it. ---> Neither may I.
Steve doesn't have to do it. ---> Neither do I.
Steve needn't do it. (BrE) ---> Neither must I.
Steve doesn't have a car. ---> Neither do I.
Steve hasn't got a car. (BrE) ---> Neither have I.

Steve has got to go. ---> So ??? I. (?have?)

P.S. By the way, is it really true that no Americans ever use "needn't" instead of"don't / doesn't have to"? Well, I've never heard an American use "needn't" and I don't use it either but who knows... And what about Canadians and "needn't"?
PastsimpleP.S. By the way, is it really true that no Americans ever use "needn't" instead of"don't / doesn't have to"? Well, I've never heard an American use "needn't" and I don't use it either but who knows... And what about Canadians and "needn't"?
Never say "never". It is rare, but I hear it, and I use it occasionally.
You needn't worry is one way that Americans use it.
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Grammar GeekYou needn't worry is one way that Americans use it.
Meaning there's no reason for you to be worried. Is that it? That's the way the Brits use it, I guess.

Could I say You don't have to worry? (Well, I often use itEmotion: wink)

Final question: are the sentences (dealing with must, have to, have got to, mustn't, have, have got) in my last post correct?
They all looked good to me, but I can't comment on the BrE usage. The final one would be "and so much I."

Yes, you certainly can say "You don't have to worry" and I'm just as apt to say that as "You needn't worry." (Or simply "Don't worry" or even (informally) "no worries.")