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The difference between work and play is not clear. Few parents would dispute that their children learn the rules of games, or learn to enact certain roles in make-believe activities, or improve physical skills by taking part in sport. So learning of some sort seems to be going on. Furthermore, a powerful marketing strategy in recent years has been to persuade parents that certain toys or pastimes have greater potential for encouraging learning than others.

My book says 'others' here are 'other toys and pastimes'. Is it really so? Are 'others' here restricted to toys and pastimes only?

In my opinion, they're just more general, like 'other things' ...

Comments  
Who is making this statement, "...persuade parents that certain toys or pastimes have greater potential for encouraging learning than others". People who are giving this marketing strategy, and given the above info it is not clear how pastimes are used in a marketing strategy. Given what is there, I would say it only refers to toys, for the obvious reason you can sell toys. You can't really sell pastimes unless you introduce new information.

If anything other is to be considered, then that "other" should be mentioned.
Grammatically speaking, I agree with Taka's book. Moreover some toy firms also manufacture "tools" for creative pastimes, which cannot be referred to as actual toys. I'm thinking of beads, dough, etc etc...
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The text is about the fact that there is no clear-cut difference between work (or study) and play; Kids can learn somothing important through things seen as 'play' by adults in general, or vice-versa.

So, some toy manufacturers, I thought, would advertise that their products-toys-were better for kids to learn something meaningful than some other typical educationally-recommended things.

Anything wrong with this interpretation?
For your information, the sentences are followed by this:

...So if there is a difference between the activities of the classroom and the playroom it cannot be that learning only takes place in one, but maybe that what is learned is seen as one of more value in one context than the other.
There's very little doubt in my mind, for the moment at least, that others refers to toys or pastimes (i.e., ways of passing the time). Some toys, it is asserted, have more educational potential than other toys. Some ways of passing the time, (with or without what some people may call toys), it is asserted , have more educational potential than other ways of passing the time.

I think pastimes is pretty generalized, if that's your concern.
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Yes, that's how I see it too. The intended sense seems to be:

"Furthermore, a powerful marketing strategy in recent years has been to persuade parents that some toys and pastimes have greater potential for encouraging learning than others."

MrP
That's how I see it too Emotion: smile
OK, people. I understand.

Thank you!
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