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Are these correct? What do they mean?

1. We have often found that going off to lunch or driving home from the office, brings enlightenment that has otherwise eluded us through hours of typing away at the keyboard.

2. We have often found that going off to lunch or driving home from the office, brings enlightenment that would otherwise eluded us through hours of typing away at the keyboard.

Thanks.
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Hi Jack,

This sounds better:

We have often found that going off for lunch or driving home from the office, brings enlightenment that would otherwise elude us through hours of typing away at the keyboard.

Savvy
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No comma between the subject and the predicate (of your subordinate clause)!

My version:
We have often found that going off to lunch or driving home from the office brings enlightenment that would otherwise have eluded us through hours of typing away at the keyboard.

CJ
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Comments  
What do these ones mean? I can't distinguish the difference in meaning between these sentences:

1. We have often found that going off to lunch or driving home from the office brings enlightenment that would otherwise elude us through hours of typing away at the keyboard.

2. We have often found that going off to lunch or driving home from the office brings enlightenment that would otherwise eluded us through hours of typing away at the keyboard.

3. We have often found that going off to lunch or driving home from the office brings enlightenment that would otherwise have eluded us through hours of typing away at the keyboard.

4. We have often found that going off to lunch or driving home from the office brings enlightenment that would otherwise eluded us through hours of typing away at the keyboard.

Thanks.
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