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I had an English teacher a long time ago who liked using ought to instead of should.
Do you think there is a large difference between these two words?
Is ought to more polite than should?
Is should more commanding?

What is your interpretation of the difference between these two words?
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Comments  (Page 2) 
In North American English, "ought" is very rarely used. In fact, I myself have never used it. I use "should", or construct the sentence differently to avoid using "ought".
ought to is more formal than should .
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Ought is a moral imperative; should is a suggestion.
AnonymousOught is a moral imperative
Only if morality is trivialized! Emotion: smile
You really ought to throw out those leftovers in the fridge. They're getting really smelly.
CJ
I'd say the difference in intenseness is rather nominal in modern English. If you were in a situation where you had to say ought to to intend 'stronger expectation/suggestion'
than should, why not try have to or must instead? These two should be more effective. The difference shouldn't be about which is more intense, but about which is more frequently used in which English speaking country and which is more formal, if there is difference also in formality.
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As a native speaker, I agree with what CalifJim has posted and respectfully disagree with what other posters have written. (At least for English as it is spoken in the Northeastern US; I don't know if it is different elsewhere.)

"Ought" and "should" are completely interchangeable in the ways described in CalifJim's earlier post. Certainly emphasis, tone, and context can make one of them firmer or more gentle--but in my opinion that is equally true of both words.

I've gone over in my head all the examples posted and could equally exchange "ought" for "should" in each one. I would gladly tell my guests, "You should come back sometime!" and I would be glad to hear it from someone hosting me.

Also, I don't agree that "ought" is uncommon in North American English. We have many expressions such as "I ought to give her a piece of my mind!" or "There ought to be a law!" ... or simply "Why, I oughta...." (the "oughta" spelling reflects how it is usually pronounced in these slangy expressions).

True, some of these are starting to sound a little old-fashioned now, but they sound perfectly natural in American English, and there's nothing "formal" or "gentle" about them! :-)
From "Physics, 2nd Edition" by Douglas C. Giancoli[1] :

"Scientific laws are different from political laws in that the latter are prescriptive: they tell us how we must behave. Scientific laws are descriptive: they do not say how nature must behave, but rather describe how nature does behave."

Which modification, if either, seems congruent with the original?

"Scientific laws are different from political laws in that the latter are prescriptive: they tell us how we ought to behave. Scientific laws are descriptive: they do not say how nature ought to behave, but rather describe how nature shall behave."

"Scientific laws are different from political laws in that the latter are prescriptive: they tell us how we should behave. Scientific laws are descriptive: they do not say how nature should behave, but rather describe how nature ought to behave."

The Online Etymology Dictionary seems to suggest that at some point shall departed from the owes/obligation sense to "include 'futurity.' "

For further consideration:

"She owes to pay a dollar." (Currently true?)

"She owed to pay a dollar." (Previously true?)

"She ought to pay a dollar." (Same as line above?)

"She shall pay a dollar." (It is going to happen?)

"She should pay a dollar." (Previously true that it is going to happen?)

And the following farce:

Judge: "How much did she borrow from you?"
Lender: "She ought to pay a dollar."
Judge: "Very well. She shall pay a dollar within thirty days."
...Later...

Curious: "What happened at the trial?"
Trial attendee: "She should pay a dollar."

Ought the sun to rise tomorrow? Or should the sun rise tomorrow?

Should the answer have been easy, we would know the answer now. Ought the answer to have been easy, we would know the answer now.

[1] http://www.amazon.ca/s?_encoding=UTF8&search-alias=books-ca&field-author=Douglas%20C.%20Giancoli

[2] http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=shall
or ought is just like the worrd 'must', right?
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what is the main diffrence between both words
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