+0
A dentist used to run a dental office, but he is no longer in the business now. One day, he ran into a friend. The friend asked, "Do you still run dental office?"

Could the dentist reply, "I'm out of business?"

Thanks,
Comments  
Hi,
A dentist considers himself a professional, not a businessman. He practices dentistry. He calls himself a dental practitioner. He calls his business 'my practice'.

If he retired, he might say 'I retired'.
Otherwise, he might say 'I gave up my practice' or 'I sold my practice' or 'I don't practice any more.'

Same thing for doctors.

Best wishes,
Clive
Hi Clive,

What about a guy used to run a night club, but he is no longer in the business now.

Can he say, "I'm out of business?" or any other better suggestions?

Thanks a lot and best wishes to you too.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
When someone says, "I'm out of business," it usually means that their business was unsuccessful.
Hi YoungCal,

Haven't seen you for a while. How is everything?

A guy used to run a night club, but he is no longer in the business now.

Can he say, "I quit my business?" or any other better suggestions?

______________

Just out of curiosity, are you an undergraduate or graduate student at USC?

Good luck to your study.
If I may intrude, I think an employee can say "I quit!", but the boss isn't likely to say that. It would mean s/he leaves the business into the hands of whoever still works there.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
hello everybody,

I think "to quit my business" works very well.
I think you can also say "to give up the business"
"I am no longer in that business"
"I am not in that business any more"
"No, I am in a different business now"
Hi meantolearn,

I think that "I quit my business" sounds fine, and I am an undergraduate.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.