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My memory is now somewhat vague, but I remember I ran across the expression, something like

[1] I'm out of the league with ...

somewhere.

Could somebody please help me clear up my memory? Can I say, "I'm out of the league with baseball," and mean I'm not too good at it, or that I'm not knowledgeable about it?

I know you would say something like

{2] Baseball is out of my league,

meaning pretty much the same.

Hiro

Sendai, Japan
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Also would it be

"He is out of his depth with that difficult math," or "in that difficult math"?

Hiro
[2] Baseball is out of my league
feels natural, [1] doesn't.

"He is out of his depth during/in that difficult math test."
sounds more natural to me.
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I only know the expression "s/he's out out my league", meaning s/he's too good, intelligent, whatever for me to ever dream of dating her/him, for example.
Thank you, both. My memory is taking shape again.

Wouldn't you use the "is out of the league...." exression anywhere? And, would you ever say, "... out of my league with ..."? If you would, what sort of noun follows with?

Hiro
Hi Hiro,

Speaking of 'a league' in this way is an idiomatic expression. With such expressions, you have to use them in certain more or less fixed ways. If you start using them in slightly different ways, they tend to sound odd, and often even amusing.

You can say 'Someone is out of someone's league'.

You can say 'Someone is not in someone else's league'.

It's odd to speak of 'the league'.

Tom is a nice guy, but he's not very bright and he has no job. He's out of his league with this beautiful, intelligent, rich woman. Sure, sounds fine.

Best wishes, Clive
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Much obliged, Clive.Emotion: smile

Yes, I know it's an idiomatic expression. But I thought there might be a variation or two, and that I would be better off if I ask to check it, as I had this weird feeling I'd heard them somewhere.

As always, thanks, all.

Hiro
When an expression's idiomatic, better leave it alone... Emotion: sad