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If my composition is not relevant to the topic, do I say "My composition if out of point" or "My composition of off the point" ?

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My composition is off-topic.
Maybe you're looking for the expression "not to the point"?

CJ
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
CalifJimMaybe you're looking for the expression "not to the point"?

CJ

In Singapore, many teachers will write 'out of point' when a composition is not relevant to the topic. A native speaker friend of mine told me that it should be 'off the point'. That's why I've posted the question.
I wouldn't use them.
BBC doesn't, it seems.
In the same place, "not to the point" is generally used in "not to the extent" contexts.

Try "miss the point," or perhaps "out of focus."
From a dictionary ('Oxford American Dictionaries'):

"off the point" = irrelevant
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AnnvanFrom a dictionary ('Oxford American Dictionaries'): "off the point" = irrelevant

Good obs.

At Google:

26 from nytimes.com for "off the point"
96 from bbc.co.uk for "off the point"

thus it seems OK on both sides of the Pond.

I think it was the other one which I didn't find.

Yes, indeed:

1 from nytimes.com for "out of point"
6 from bbc.co.uk for "out of point"
Hi Marius

I've to say that my native speaker friend is not correct because 'out of point' is also used.
Yoong LiatI've to say that my native speaker friend is not correct because 'out of point' is also used.
Well, he was correct in that his proposal is seemingly hitting on more people than yours.
If you're, say, a candidate for political office, you should be able to talk "mainstream," be understood by most people.

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