Hi
I wanted to ask this question for long, but thought it's silly to. Anyway, I could afford to be silly, so I ask now.
When people say "I will be out of town next week", must it imply that the guy is leaving his town, or just taking holiday (maybe in town)? As a non-native speaker of English, I ask this because I found some friends make "out of town" synonym to "holidays in town". I guess it may be wrong to say "out of town" while one is on town, or it could be loosely interpreted as "holiday wherever"? With thanks for all advices.
Kevin
Hong Kong
Hi,

I live in Toronto.

If I say 'I will be out of town next week', it means that I will not be in Toronto.

( I could be lying, of course, just to avoid talking to you. Emotion: wink )

There is another idiom 'on the town'.

'Tom is out on the town' means Tom is out going to bars, clubs, etc. in order to have a good time.

Best wishes, Clive
Hi I wanted to ask this question for long, but thought it's silly to. Anyway, I could afford to be ... town" while one is on town, or it could be loosely interpreted as "holiday wherever"? With thanks for all advices.

The only way that I can see that "I will be out of town next week" could be said to mean anything other than that the person will be in another town next week is when the person is deliberately lying in order to escape a social obligation.
I see no loose interpretation possible.

Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Hi I wanted to ask this question for long, but ... loosely interpreted as "holiday wherever"? With thanks for all advices.

The only way that I can see that "I will be out of town next week" could be said to ... is when the person is deliberately lying in order to escape a social obligation. I see no loose interpretation possible.

While I generally agree, I do suspect that occasionally some use it to mean simply "I will be unavailable through my normal business contacts" (telephone, email, etc.). Thogu they may just ne taking a week off at home, the effct, for business purposes, is as if they were elsewhere. Sloppy, but, as I say, I think it happens.

Cordially,
Eric Walker, Owlcroft House
http://owlcroft.com/english /
Hi I wanted to ask this question for long, but thought it's silly to. Anyway, I could afford to be ... speaker of English, I ask this because I found some friends make "out of town" synonym to "holidays in town".

I think those people have a grave psychological illness.

Either that or they don't want to be bothered during the weekend and don't think it's anyone's business what they will be doing.

They consider innocent. I consider it an innocent lie. Not so bad, but it's best not to get in the habit of lying.
"I'll be away" gives the same result without any lie. It probably means away from home, but it isn't even that specific. If perchance they are staying home, it must mean "away from work".
I guess it may be wrong to say "out of town" while one is on town, or it could be loosely interpreted as "holiday wherever"? With thanks for all advices. Kevin Hong Kong

Posters should say where they live, and for which area they are asking questions. I was born and then lived in Western Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis 7 years
Chicago 6 years
Brooklyn, NY 12 years
Baltimore 26 years