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Are outside and outside of interchangeable?

I found that "outside of" can mean beyond the boundaries of but I think "outside" can function in that sense as well.

What do you think?

Thanks for your time in advance.

Sincerely,

Tony
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"Outside the city" vs. "outside of the city". The second version sounds better to me, though they have the same meaning.

"Outside" is most often used to describe not being in a building. "Outside of" is often used for a particular location.
i think "out side of the sity" more meaning full
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Thanks so much for your answer!

Does that apply to inside vs inside of as well?

-Tony
Here's my take!

Outside (noun) We painted the outside, leaving the inside until tomorrow.

Outside (averb) We had the picnic outside instead of indoors.

Outside (preposition) I saw the fire outside the window. [no of here].

Outside (adjective) The outside lock had been broken by the burglars.

Many people use the word as a preposition but still add of, which hurts my ears. It's somewhat tricky, I guess: just remember that if you are using the word as a preposition, with an object of the preposition, no other preposition [of] is necessary.
Thanks so much for your answer.

Does it apply to "inside vs. inside of" as well?

Sincerely,

Tony
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Thanks so much for your answer.

Does that apply to "inside vs. inside of" as well?

Sincerely,

Tony
FakakiThanks so much for your answer.Does that apply to "inside vs. inside of" as well?Sincerely,Tony
Yes.
FakakiAre outside and outside of interchangeable?
For some people. The "outside of" wording is wordy http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/wordy and unnecessary.
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