Hi all.

Context: a call for paper for a conference (let's calll it "ABC 2012") I'm working on.

Background: next year the seventh edition of the conference will be held; the first conference was held in 1999.

Now, I'm struggling with an easy sentence and am undecided on how to write it (possilbly, concisely and nicely. Am I asking for too much? Emotion: smile). Here's what I've got so far:

"Building on ABC’s history, which spans over a decade, ABC 2012 will ..."

"Building on ABC’s history, spanning over a decade, ABC 2012 will ..."

"Building on ABC’s over-decennial history, ABC 2012 will ..."

The thing is, "over-decennial" yelds two results only on a Google search restricted to *.uk websites , which suggests no native would ever dream of using it. (though I'd like the idea of shortening the phrase by putting an adjective there).

Do #1 and #2 work? Any better ideas?

Thank you very much. Emotion: smile
"which suggests no native would ever dream of using it"

True. I would certainly never use such a monstrosity.

Both 1 and 2 are fine. I might give a slight preference to 2 but not by much.
Hi,

Context: a call for paper for a conference (let's calll it "ABC 2012") I'm working on.

Background: next year the seventh edition of the conference will be held; the first conference was held in 1999. So a few years had no conference?

Now, I'm struggling with an easy sentence and am undecided on how to write it (possilbly, concisely and nicely. Am I asking for too much? ). Here's what I've got so far:

"Building on ABC’s history, which spans over a decade, ABC 2012 will ..."

"Building on ABC’s history, spanning over a decade, ABC 2012 will ..."

"Building on ABC’s over-decennial history, ABC 2012 will ..."

The thing is, "over-decennial" yelds two results only on a Google search restricted to *.uk websites , which suggests no native would ever dream of using it. absolutely not!!!

(though I'd like the idea of shortening the phrase by putting an adjective there).

Do #1 and #2 work? Do you think the idea of spanning over a decade sounds like 'more than ten conferences'?

Clive
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
AnonymousTrue. I would certainly never use such a monstrosity.
Emotion: big smile Thanks! I suspected that.

Can you come up with any adjective that conveys the idea of "spanning for more than 10 years"?

(We've got one in my native language, although one that you'd encounter in written texts only and would not hear in an ordinary conversation).
CliveSo a few years had no conference?
Yep, it's supposed to be biannual, but if I remember correcly they didn't regularly stick to that schedule.

CliveDo you think the idea of spanning over a decade sounds like 'more than ten conferences'?
No, I don't think so because the title has the words "Seventh ABC conference" in it, and the word "seventh" is repeated in the introduction.
Hi,

Have you considered saying it another way?

eg Continuing ABC's tradition, . . .

Clive
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
CliveContinuing ABC's tradition, . . .
Thanks Clive, this could be a good option. Emotion: smile

Am I to understand there's no adjective in English that conveys precisely what I'd like to say?

TanitCan you come up with any adjective that conveys the idea of "spanning for more than 10 years"?

(We've got one in my native language, although one that you'd encounter in written texts only and would not hear in an ordinary conversation).
Hi,

Can't think of one word.

Does your language have one word for 'more than 10 years'?

Clive
Hi,

CliveCan't think of one word.
OK, thanks! Emotion: smile

CliveDoes your language have one word for 'more than 10 years'?
Yep. It's "ultradecennale" ("ultra" is a prefix, so in a dictionary you'd need to look up "decennale", decennial).

As I said, not a common word in conversation, but fine in a text.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?