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Overseas: to or in a foreign country, especially those separated from your country by the sea or ocean
Abroad: in or to a foreign country


(from Oxford advanced learners dictionary)

But when I'm talking about a country that is divided from another by the sea, would be wrong to refer to it as abroad?? Are this two adverbs interchangeable??

thanks
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Hi,

Use 'abroad' for going to any country outside your own. If the trip involves crossing an ocean, you can use either 'abroad' or 'overseas'.

Best wishes, Clive
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Clive,

I'm wondering about actually usage, though.

As one North American to another, if someone said "I've just returned from a trip abroad," would you be surprised to hear that means he merely viewed Niagra Falls from the other side? I would. I would have been thinking France or Greece or China or something.
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Hi,

Yes, much depends on the specific case and context. But how about if someone has been working in Canada for 3 years and says ''I've been working abroad for several years." Would that sound acceptable?

I think 'abroad' really derives from the idea of being away from your own place. eg Children should not be abroad or at large at night without their parents. eg He travelled the length and breadth of Europe.

I rather feel Americans have an outlook that is conditioned by the fact that they see themselves as occupying a major part of the continent. I don't know if you would agree about this.

I thought you might take me up on 'overseas'. On Canadian radio, I heard someone from South Carolina being interviewed. He said to the Canadian interviewer, 'I don't know what you people overseas do in this kind of situation, but here in the States we . . '. Emotion: smile

Best wishes, Clive
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CliveOn Canadian radio, I heard someone from South Carolina being interviewed. He said to the Canadian interviewer, 'I don't know what you people overseas do in this kind of situation, but here in the States we . . '. Emotion: smile

On behalf of my countrymen, I'm embarrassed about to hear that! I'm dearly hoping the gentlemen in question didn't think Canada was some European country.

You're right - if they said they were working abroad for three years, and Canada was the place "abroad," that does make more sense. But a quick visit abroad... hmm. Just nuances that are hard to put your finger on.