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"Lounge" has several meanings on this side of the pond. It can mean an adjustable rubber and metal chair found alongside a swimming pool.

I'm not part of the comma police, but might I suggest the replacement of 'and' with 'or a' after 'adjustable rubber'?

So, what's an adjustable rubber?

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Skitt filted:
I'm not part of the comma police, but might I suggest the replacement of 'and' with 'or a' after 'adjustable rubber'?

So, what's an adjustable rubber?

Ten bucks, same as in town..r
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I'm not part of the comma police, but might I suggest the replacement of 'and' with 'or a' after 'adjustable rubber'?

So, what's an adjustable rubber?

They all are. You roll out only what is needed.
Lepidopteran typed thus:

I know that we tend to be a lot less ... nightclub/lounge" anymore, now it's "going out drinking, at the bars")

What sort of circles do you move in? I've never heard anybody say either of those things; then again I've ... to the pub". Direct and straightforward, and unchanged for the 30 years during which I've been old enough to drink..

There used to be (maybe still are, some places) establishments called "cocktail lounges". These were dark, had tiny little "cocktail tables", comfortable chairs, and soft music. They were relaxing places to stop for a drink after work, or conduct a tryst.
Similar, better lit, more spacious "lounges" are to be found in larger hotels. These are likely to serve food.
A lounge in a Las Vegas hotel features live entertainment.

John Varela
(Trade "OLD" lamps for "NEW" for email.)
I apologize for munging the address but the spam was too much.
"Lounge" has several meanings on this side of the pond. It can mean an adjustable rubber and metal chair found alongside a swimming pool.

ITYM "chaise longue".

John Varela
(Trade "OLD" lamps for "NEW" for email.)
I apologize for munging the address but the spam was too much.
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Lepidopteran typed thus: What sort of circles do you move ... 30 years during which I've been old enough to drink..

There used to be (maybe still are, some places) establishments called "cocktail lounges". These were dark, had tiny little "cocktail tables", comfortable chairs, and soft music. They were relaxing places to stop for a drink after work, or conduct a tryst.

According to COD10, the origin of 'cocktail' is:
– ORIGIN C17: from cock1 + tail1; earlier denoting a horse with a docked tail, later a racehorse which was not a thoroughbred (through having a ***-tailed horse in its pedigree).
This does not make sense to me as far as a drink is concerned. I came across the following in a novel by Sheri Tepper* over the weekend:

"It dates, so I'm told, from the early years of the 19th century in New Orleans where cognac was mixed with bitters using an old-style egg cup - called a coquetier - to measure the ingredients. From cah-cuh-tyay to ***-tay to ***-tail would have required only the slovenly enunciation of half a generation."
I have no idea if there's any truth in this, but it makes a sort of sense.

*"Marianne, the Magus and the Manticore."

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Hertfordshire
England
Most clubs have nicknames used extensively by supporters and sometimes by non-supporters. Man U are the Red Devils. Man City are the Sky Blues. Norwich are the Canaries (go figure).

Norwich is one of the popular breeds of canary:
http://www.solcon.nl/norwich-gloster/page2.htm
The Norwich is a well filled bird that attracts many fanciers at exhibitions through its impressing(1) shape and peaceful appearance. The feather quality should be close, firm and should have a natural shine to it. The head is well filled, round and broad in proportion to the body. A short closely folded tail and short length legs are required. The well filled body must not touch the perch and should be in a nice rounded line from beak to underside of tail.
(1)The original version of the page is written in Dutch.
Regards
John
for mail: my initials plus those of alt.usage.english at tpg dot com dot au
Dr Robin Bignall typed thus:

Interesting. My parents were burning raw coal until about 1966, ... the chimneys had been capped and they were just ornamental.

If it's not legal to burn normal coal in parts of Cheshire and Wales then there are plenty of rural folk breaking the law.

Also in Wet Yorks, where only a couple of months ago I pushed the buggy past an actual coalman emptying a sack of coal into the coal cellar of one of the local Victorian back-to-backs. I stopped for a chat, since I'd not smelt coal dust for many years and enjoyed the nostalgia. And the smell.

Hooray for the differently sane.
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