1 2  4 5 6 7 8 14
R H Draney falt:
Suggestion to Donna for a new FAQ entry: "When R H Draney says something that appears to make no sense at all, chances are it's a reference to a song lyric"....r

Chances are your chances are awfully good.
Ahá! That explains your earlier mysterious reference to handcuffs:

Song 1:

MASTER P - Let` Em Go
Album : Good Side Bad Side
(feat. )
(Master P)
This goes out to anybody in the club
That's with somebody and wanna to be with somebody else I mean, some of y'all ain't got y'all *** together And wanna be with a baller, let 'em go
(Chorus:) (4x)
(Master P)
Let 'em go (let 'em go)
Let 'em go (let 'em go)
Don't handcuff 'em whodi let the girl work the floor.

Song 2:

The Luniz
Lunitik Muzik
Handcuff Your Hoes
(Chorus: The Luniz)
Handcuff your hoes, the girl is yours
Handcuff your hoes, if the girl is yours
Handcuff your hoes, if the girl is yours
Handcu-u-u-ff your hoes (your hoes), I'm breezy.

Reinhold (Rey) Aman
Who's breezy, too, after a bowl of lentil soup
IMHO, it's not just the words that are vulgar, it's the mention of the action. Whether you say "urinate", "tinkle", ... agree with the poster who prefers "Excuse me for a moment" or similar.You don't need a euphemism in most cases.

Actually, in "The Youngest Godfather" (based on the memoirs of Joe Bonanno), we learn that if one gangster tells another gangster "I gotta ***", it's time to run for the exits. It's not more information than you require, but it is more than the plotter should give you. Although, come to think of it, "I'll be right back" should raise red flags just as much.

Jon Miller
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Don A. Gilmore filted:
Crikey, mate, don't get your bowels in an uproar. http://www.stlyrics.com/lyrics/oklahoma/kansascity.htm

Ah, I see. Sorry for the curt reply. A song about Kansas City circa 130 years ago or so, I see.

I'm afraid I can't grant you 130 years...the song is good for about sixty ("Oklahoma!" opened in 1943); the Kansas City so described roughly a hundred...evidence in another tune in the libretto suggests that Oklahoma's statehood is imminent (no later than 1907), and a dance break in the very song that led us down this thread contains the line "Why, this here's ragtime!", a concept someone like Will Parker couldn't have learned of, even in cosmopolitan K.C., before about 1895 at the earliest..
You should visit our fair city sometime. The only people wearing cowboy hats around here are the ones visiting from Texas. ;-)

The number's a great example of American irony (complete with the hint of sarcasm the Brits require of that word)...Will returns to tiny Claremore, Oklahoma Territory, so far behind the times that even Kansas City (1) seems incredibly sophisticated, and regales his fellow cowboys with all the marvels he's seen and what a big-city swell he's become..r

(1) additional dig at turn-of-the-previous-century Kansas City courtesy of Rodgers and Hammerstein, not me..
Lepidopteran typed thus:
I know that we tend to be a lot less formal and euphemistic in our speech nowadays (e.g., few people seem to say "going out for cocktails, at the nightclub/lounge" anymore, now it's "going out drinking, at the bars")

What sort of circles do you move in? I've never heard anybody say either of those things; then again I've never been inside a nightclub and I don't even know what a lounge might be in that context.
If we want to express that activity, we say we are "going for a drink", or "going to the pub". Direct and straightforward, and unchanged for the 30 years during which I've been old enough to drink..

David
==
Lepidopteran typed thus:
I know that we tend to be a lot less formal and euphemistic in our speech nowadays (e.g., few people seem to say "going out for cocktails, at the nightclub/lounge" anymore, now it's "going out drinking, at the bars")

What sort of circles do you move in? I've never heard anybody say either of those things; then again I've never been inside a nightclub and I don't even know what a lounge might be in that context.
If we want to express that activity, we say we are "going for a drink", or "going to the pub". Direct and straightforward, and unchanged for the 30 years during which I've been old enough to drink..

David
==
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Lepidopteran typed thus:
I know that we tend to be a lot less formal and euphemistic in our speech nowadays (e.g., few people seem to say "going out for cocktails, at the nightclub/lounge" anymore, now it's "going out drinking, at the bars")

What sort of circles do you move in? I've never heard anybody say either of those things; then again I've never been inside a nightclub and I don't even know what a lounge might be in that context.
If we want to express that activity, we say we are "going for a drink", or "going to the pub". Direct and straightforward, and unchanged for the 30 years during which I've been old enough to drink..

David
==
Lepidopteran typed thus:
I know that we tend to be a lot less formal and euphemistic in our speech nowadays (e.g., few people seem to say "going out for cocktails, at the nightclub/lounge" anymore, now it's "going out drinking, at the bars")

What sort of circles do you move in? I've never heard anybody say either of those things; then again I've never been inside a nightclub and I don't even know what a lounge might be in that context.
If we want to express that activity, we say we are "going for a drink", or "going to the pub". Direct and straightforward, and unchanged for the 30 years during which I've been old enough to drink..

David
==
I'm afraid I can't grant you 130 years...the song is good for about sixty ("Oklahoma!" opened in 1943); the Kansas ... here'sragtime!", a concept someone like Will Parker couldn't have learned of, even incosmopolitan K.C., before about 1895 at the earliest..

Well, I wasn't taking into account the exact period that the musical takes place within. But Kansas City was once indeed a Wild West city. The time of the Wild West in America was from about the end of the Civil War (1865) until the turn of the (Twentieth) century. KC underwent a tremendous boom during that time and the population exploded from 4000 in 1865 to 32,000 in
1870 and over 160,000 by 1900. I can see how someone from rural Oklahomamight have been bewildered when visiting.
Don
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Obviously, Don is not into Broadway musicals. Or very young.

Or capable of dare Iuse the word? irony.

Or maybe he's heard that mindless association of u-t-d with KC just one too many times. You know, like the way people make witty little remarks about other people's names when they meet, forgetting that the subject has probably heard them dozens of times. Finally, SNAP...

My bet is that these three placenames evoke the same associations, in an American audience at least. Immediate reactions only no fair thinking too hard and getting clever:
Liverpool -
Nottingham -
Newcastle -

Best Donna Richoux
Show more