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Tony Cooper filted:

Ship and Sanitary Canal
Seattle = ?

Sea-Tac and drizzle
Memphis = ?

Sun Records
Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany

"it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward" (Email Removed) Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com Embedded software/hardware/analog Info for designers: http://www.speff.com
Tony Cooper filted:

Now for the English:

Token response from a Yank, for calibration purposes...it should come as no surprise that they're all song lyrics..

My thinking as I wrote them.

Good pizza
Seattle = ?

Slew
Memphis = ?

Slim
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Anybody feel like going for a few more?... Chicago = ?

Totally Crap Pizza.(1)
Seattle = ?

Not Quite Vancouver
Memphis = ?

Steve Cropper, Quentin Claunch, James Carr, Dan Penn & Spooner Oldham, Stax, Dusty In, the MLK hit, poorly evoked milieus in Grisham novels.. oh, and that cheesey house that inspired the title of a misguided Paul Simon project.
(Serious answers: 1. Probably Capone, prohibition, etc.
2. Nothing much Microsoft maybe, at a push.
3. Probably Mississippi riverboats before Elvis, oddly enough)

Ross Howard
Lepidopteran typed thus:

(e.g., few people seem to say "going out for cocktails, at the nightclub/lounge" anymore, now it's "going out drinking, at the bars")

I've never heard anybody say either of those things; then again I've never been inside a nightclub and I don't even know what a lounge might be in that context.

I think in the UK, the word "lounge", as a noun, refers to what those in the US call a "living room", or maybe a family room with a sofa or two. Correct me if I'm wrong.
"Lounge" has several meanings on this side of the pond. It can mean an adjustable rubber and metal chair found alongside a swimming pool. It can even mean, strangely relevant to the original thread, certain kinds of public restroom facilities. That's right, some places here used to have a "Ladies' Lounge" referring to a carpeted room containing sofas and/or cushion chairs one entered on the way to the room with the plumbing. (Never once have I heard anyone speaking out against THIS gender inequity.)
But in the context I was referring to, "Lounge" is yet another euphemism for a bar/pub, usually one that's found off the lobby of a hotel or ancillary to an upscale restaurant. I think the term is supposed to imply a watering hole that is classier than a typical dive. The word "Lounge" in this context is actually rarely used in conversation unless referring to a specific or named location, such as "The Green Parrot Lounge". Or, if a fella is well-known for making acquaintance with multiple women at the local bars, he is often referred to as a "Lounge Lizard".
"Nightclub" generally refers to a bar that has entertainment of some sort, usually a DJ or live band. IMHO, that term is more than just another euphemism for a bar, since not everyone who goes there does so to drink. Of course, most specialty nightclubs, such as a Comedy Club or even a "Gentleman's Club", more often than not have a 2-drink minimum, and your only alternative is a $5 Coca-Cola.
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"Lounge" has several meanings on this (Left) side of the pond. It can mean an adjustable rubber and metal chair ... restroom facilities. ... But in the context I was referring to, "Lounge" is yet another euphemism for a bar/pub ...

And let us not forget airport-speak, where "boarding lounge" means a waiting room.

Mark Brader > (Monosyllables being forbidden to doctors of philosophy, Toronto > such truths are called "invariants" in the trade.) (Email Removed) > Jeff Prothero
I applaud his good taste!

In the fridge?!?!

Of course not, he couldn't possibly fit in there.
Anyway, when "room temperature" is a toasty 32 degrees, you have to cool the beer down somehow.
-=Eric

Come to think of it, there are already a million monkeys on a million typewriters, and Usenet is NOTHING like Shakespeare. Blair Houghton.
Lepidopteran typed thus: I've never heard anybody say either of ... even know what a lounge might be in that context.

I think in the UK, the word "lounge", as a noun, refers to what those in the US call a ... even a "Gentleman's Club", more often than not have a 2-drink minimum, and your only alternative is a $5 Coca-Cola.

The traditional British pub had a "public bar", with pretty basic facilities, usually bare floor, and a dartboard, as well as a "lounge bar", with a carpet, and drinks at higher prices. Women were expected, and sometimes required, to use the latter; men in "working clothes" the former. Some such pubs survive, although they are a dwindling minority; I think the price differential has gone, though.

I don't think that "lounge" would be taken in this sense unless the conversation was already on the topic of pubs.

Don Aitken
Mail to the addresses given in the headers is no longer being read. To mail me, substitute "clara.co.uk" for "freeuk.com".
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Beatles The sheriff that plagued Robin Hood Brown Ale The ... always some in the fridge for when he comes over.

I applaud his good taste!

In the fridge?!?!

John Dean
Oxford
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