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Here are the associations from a representative of the Danish audience:

Interesting. Newcastle's ale now leads Newcastle's coals in familiarity. The Nottingham impulse associations are also interesting. I assume that Sherwood ... bit too off-beat. The second fleeting impulse reaction was "Liverpudlian". It's such a great word. Now for the English: Phoenix

By the time I get to ...
New York

...minute
San Francisco

Golden Gate

John Dean
Oxford
Tony Cooper filted:

Windy City
Seattle = ?

Frasier
Memphis = ?Blues Again

John Dean
Oxford
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
You know, I don't think I've ever heard an American say anything about "coals to Newcastle". I'm not even certain ... that I have. But anyway, Newcastle has no particular associations for me. No associations at all, perhaps I should say.

It's very common among bookish, "literary" Americans.
Michael West
Anybody feel like going for a few more?... Chicago = ?

That toddlin' town.
Seattle = ?

's Best Coffee.
Memphis = ?

Graceland.
-Aaron J. Dinkin
Dr. Whom
Frankfurt = ?
er
Hamburg = ?
er
Wien = ?
er
Berlin = ?
er
Munchen = ?
Toto and Dorothy
Ist gut, ja?

Joachim
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
That toddlin' town. 's Best Coffee. Graceland.

Frankfurt = ? er

Am Main oder Oder?

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
I applaud his good taste!

In the fridge?!?!

It's bottled, innit?

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Steve Hayes typed thus:

United

What's Liverpool United? We occasionally say "a Liverpool United match" in the north west of England, but only when Liverpool are playing Manchester United.

Well there you have it.
The only time I ever watched Liverpool was when they played United.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Lepidopteran typed thus: I've never heard anybody say either of ... even know what a lounge might be in that context.

I think in the UK, the word "lounge", as a noun, refers to what those in the US call a "living room", or maybe a family room with a sofa or two. Correct me if I'm wrong.

In South African English, yes.
In British English it's fraffly non-U to refer to a sitting room as a lounge.
"Lounge" has several meanings on this side of the pond. It can mean an adjustable rubber and metal chair found ... the way to the room with the plumbing. (Never once have I heard anyone speaking out against THIS gender inequity.)

Gives a whole new meaning to the term "lounge lizard".
But in the context I was referring to, "Lounge" is yet another euphemism for a bar/pub, usually one that's found ... well-known for making acquaintance with multiple women at the local bars, he is often referred to as a "Lounge Lizard".

Ah! Back on track, like peace talks.
Some years ago in South Africa women were not allowed in bars, and in hotels could only drink alcoholic liquor in the lounce (or in their rooms). Some hotels had public and private lounges, the latter being for residents only.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
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