I know that we tend to be a lot less formal and euphemistic in our speech nowadays (e.g., few people seem to say "going out for cocktails, at the nightclub/lounge" anymore, now it's "going out drinking, at the bars") but sometimes things can go a bit too far.

Why is it that almost every female I know under the age of 60, upon announcing an impending need to use the restroom facilities, invariably announces: "I gotta pee".
Whatever happened to the more "dignified" feminine methods of announcing a bathroom visit, such as "I need to use the ladies' room" or even the archaic "I gotta go powder my nose". (Is that why residential first-floor bathrooms without a tub or shower are still called "powder rooms"?) Heck, even a very informal "I gotta go potty" would probably be better IMHO. Maybe it's just me, and I won't go into details why (exercise left for the reader), but somehow I think it detracts from the mystique between the sexes when females overuse the word "pee" in mixed company. Sigh... yes, I know that us men have used quite a few colorful terms (take a leak, whiz, etc..) ever since the Earth cooled.
I guess we've come a long way, baby, since the time when the kids' bathroom in The Brady Bunch did not have a toilet present so as not to offend the viewer.
BTW, did you know that word "pee" started out as the letter "P", which was a socially acceptable way for children to communicate the more offensive term "***", just like many folks say "The 'F'-word" or "all effed up" to avoid saying "F k". The first time I ever saw the word pee in literature, used as a verb anyway, was in a Shel Silverstein book, either "A Light in the Attic" or "Where the Sidewalk Ends". A story about two people literally joined at the hip, complaining about how one has to pee while the other wants to engage in a different activity.
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Why is it that almost every female I know under the age of 60, upon announcing an impending need to use the restroom facilities, invariably announces: "I gotta pee".

Interesting that you say that it's women who do this. The women I know always insist that it's a male thing: "Women just say 'excuse me a minute', and leave the room, but men tell you what they're going to do!'".

Mike M
Why is it that almost every female I know under ... to use the restroom facilities, invariably announces: "I gotta pee".

I think it is stated to turn on any male listening. I once read that the male moose gets sexually aroused hearing the sound of a female moose peeing on the river or lakes surface. It sounded kinda erotic to me too.
(uh, er, substitute human female for moose)
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I think it is stated to turn on any male listening. I once read that the male moose gets sexually ... on the river or lakes surface. It sounded kinda erotic to me too. (uh, er, substitute human female for moose)

That would give '...the male human female gets sexually aroused hearing the sound of a female human female peeing...'

john
John O'Flaherty filted:
I think it is stated to turn on any male ... to me too. (uh, er, substitute human female for moose)

That would give '...the male human female gets sexually aroused hearing the sound of a female human female peeing...'

They got websites for the likes of you two..r
BTW, did you know that word "pee" started out as the letter "P", which was a socially acceptable way for children to communicate the more offensive term "***"(.)

According to the OED, the verb "to pee" is from the initial letter of the word "***". No evidence that this is indeed the origin is either explicitly presented or, in my opinion, inferrable from any of the cited uses, the earliest of which is:
"1788 E. PICKEN Epitaph Favourite Cat in Poems & Epistles 47 He never stealt, though he was poor, Nor ever pee'd his master's floor."

The other meaning of "to pee" listed in the OED is "to look with one eye (as in taking aim); to squint; to peer", with an earliest cited use in 1674. I don't consider it implausible that "to pee" meaning "to urinate" could have derived from "to pee" meaning "to take aim".

Mike Nitabach
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Where I come from, both words are considered vulgar. A mature adult would not use either word in polite company.
Don
Kansas City
Don A. Gilmore filted:
Where I come from, both words are considered vulgar. A mature adult would not use either word in polite company. Don Kansas City

I thought everything was up to date where you come from..r
IMHO, it's not just the words that are vulgar, it's the mention of the action. Whether you say "urinate", "tinkle", or "pee", you are giving your listeners more information than they require or (in most cases) desire.

I agree with the poster who prefers "Excuse me for a moment" or similar. You don't need a euphemism in most cases.
-Laura
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