A locally-made TV program of English-learning tells the would-be learners that to speak good English you must say something like "to paint the town red" instead of "to celebrate". But I think "to celebrate" seems better and straightforward, and wonder if the idiom is just a cliche?!
A friend told me when she said "it's not my cup of tea", her friend was amazed and asked her, "what? you use such a cliche".

Kevin from Hong Kong
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A locally-made TV program of English-learning tells the would-be learners that to speak good English you must say something like ... cup of tea", her friend was amazed and asked her, "what? you use such a cliche". Kevin from Hong Kong

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Any class in beginner English should teach a standard vocabulary that is devoid of idiomatic expressions and figurative language.

JMO,
David H
A locally-made TV program of English-learning tells the would-be learners that to speak good English you must say something like ... "to celebrate". But I think "to celebrate" seems better and straightforward, and wonder if the idiom is just a cliche?!

I'm not sure you've presented this the way it was intended. To be fluent in English it is necessary to understand idioms and it is helpful to be able to use them where they are appropriate. The requirements to "speak good English" are far more basic.

The intent of understanding idioms is to know when they apply as well as to know what they mean. To "celebrate" is not to "paint the town red" and "to paint the town red" does not mean "to celebrate".

You can celebrate something quietly, at home, or without a great deal of fuss. Painting the town red means going out and partying to some excess. You need not be celebrating anything. You may be celebrating something when you paint the town red, but a celebration may not be the reason.
The straightforward use of "celebration" has its place, but "painting the town red" also has appropriate applications.

Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
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A locally-made TV program of English-learning tells the would-be learners that to speak good English you must say something like ... cup of tea", her friend was amazed and asked her, "what? you use such a cliche". Kevin from Hong Kong

'To paint the town (red) "go on a spree" first recorded 1884;' from http://www.etymonline.com / Not a lot of information.

Paul
A locally-made TV program of English-learning tells the would-be learners that to speak good English you must say something like ... cup of tea", her friend was amazed and asked her, "what? you use such a cliche". Kevin from Hong Kong

'To paint the town (red) "go on a spree" first recorded 1884;' from http://www.etymonline.com / Not a lot of information.

Paul
A locally-made TV program of English-learning tells the would-be learners that to speak good English you must say something like ... cup of tea", her friend was amazed and asked her, "what? you use such a cliche". Kevin from Hong Kong

'To paint the town (red) "go on a spree" first recorded 1884;' from http://www.etymonline.com / Not a lot of information.

Paul
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A locally-made TV program of English-learning tells the would-be learners that to speak good English you must say something like ... cup of tea", her friend was amazed and asked her, "what? you use such a cliche". Kevin from Hong Kong

'To paint the town (red) "go on a spree" first recorded 1884;' from http://www.etymonline.com / Not a lot of information.

Paul
A locally-made TV program of English-learning tells the would-be learners that to speak good English you must say something like ... cup of tea", her friend was amazed and asked her, "what? you use such a cliche". Kevin from Hong Kong

'To paint the town (red) "go on a spree" first recorded 1884;' from http://www.etymonline.com / Not a lot of information.

Paul
A locally-made TV program of English-learning tells the would-be learners that to speak good English you must say something like ... cup of tea", her friend was amazed and asked her, "what? you use such a cliche". Kevin from Hong Kong

'To paint the town (red) "go on a spree" first recorded 1884;' from http://www.etymonline.com / Not a lot of information.

Paul
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