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I've never actually seen an American pancake baked in the oven. Generallywe cook them on the stove top. You are correct, however, in that it is much

I've seen French toast baked in the oven, but never pancakes.
thicker than a European pancake. I believe that the main difference isthat the typical American pancake has more flour, sugar, ... the tastes of the intendedaudience) added to the batter. Some favorites include: sausage, blueberry,blackberry, raspberry, or chocolate chip pancakes. -Joe

Sliced hot dogs (which some would count as a type of sausage and others would not) are another possible ingredient. Although that is what the British would call a "savory" ingredient, pancakes made with sliced hot dogs would typically be eaten with syrup (and, of course, butter or margarine).

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
The American pancake may have some small precooked fruit cooked its batter, but for the most part, cakey though it is, it seldom "rises" as high as 1/2 inch. I can't say, though, about pancakes in California or New York.

Speaking of New York, let's not forget that it was New York, fka Niew Amsterdam (Largest Dorp in New Netherland), that introduced the pancake (modified, perhaps, from its pre-colonization Dutch antecedents) to the US, BrE pancakes (if they even existed in the 16th century or earlier) notwithstanding. If I'm wrong about this, Donna will provide a correction. If she doesn't, I must be presumed to be correct. New York also introduced the cookie to Colonial America, BTW. It also introduced the English muffin and the bagel to Post-Colonial America. But I digress.

A proper New York pancake is probably thinner and larger in diameter than the ersatz pancakes one might find in other corners of the Republic, such as Orlando. I will say, however, that there are good pancakes to be had in Northeastern lumberjack-equivalent country, such as the coney regions of Upstate New Yerk and the maple syrup producing centers of northern New England.
A traditional pancake will not have "fruit" in its predecessor batter.
I did work in breakfast-style restaurants in Colorado and the Midwest. And I think Denny's and other such restaurants would ... cooked on the same grill as bacon, eggs, burgers, bacon, steaks, hash-browns etc. They are not oven baked.

BTW, the term for "pancake" is one of those things that varies regionally, like hero/sub/grinder/hoagie. The New York City term is "pancake", but elsewhere you can find "hotcakes", "flapjacks", "griddle cakes". For some reason McDonald's fixed upon "hotcake" for their ersatz pancake things; is "hotcake" the Illinois term?
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The US pancake seems to be a more solid, cakey kind of thing, which could be - usually is? - baked in the oven.

Never. The idea of baking a pancake is preposterous. The whole reason it's a pancake is that it's not baked. I mean, a pancake isn't cake, FCOL.
I think the AmE pancake is different enough from a crepe to be differently classified, but I've heard differing views on that matter.
Is this kind derived from Dutch rather than French cookery tradition?

I'd assume that the AmE pancake is basically of Dutch origin. That's what I'd always been led to believe. I suppose that the whole maple syrup thing got started over here.
If I'm wrong about this, Donna will provide a correction. If she doesn't, I must be presumed to be correct.

You're probably wrong about the pancake after all, it's been an English word since the 14th century but I'm mostly writing to say you are wrong about the above assumption.
If I fail to correct you on something, it can be because:

(1) I don't recognize the error
(2) I didn't read the error
(3) I don't give a darn about the error, or
(4) I have decided to save my breath.
As always, it is hard to interpret silence correctly.

On your own, kiddo Donna Richoux
Pannekoeken were my Dad's forte when I was a lad ... pannekoeken (as well oliebollen and sûkerbôlle, but that's another story)

Suikerbollen, in Dutch.

Smoutebollen is used a lot for oliebollen over here.
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Rarely, I would say most people & most places I know bake them,

You mean they rarely bake them in an oven, right? Not that you rarely say that they do.

Something along those lines.
Adding to the confusion is the false friendship between Ned. "bakken" (frying) and English "bake" (inside an oven).

In(der)deed.
but the grandmother of an ex-girlfriend of mine sometimes used an oven. They were much smaller and puffier though, also pretty heavy.

Interesting.

Extremely.
For lesser mortals there is a special tool, a 'pannekoekenmes',

So for a compound-compound, you don't have to use the N? Not "pannenkoekenmes"?

No, it should be 'pannenkoekenmes' bij the post-1996 rules.
Man, people must have been tearing their hair out over those decisions.

Why follow the rules?
Jan
Rarely, I would say most people & most places I know bake them,

You mean they rarely bake them in an oven, right? Not that you rarely say that they do. Adding to the confusion is the false friendship between Ned. "bakken" (frying) and English "bake" (inside an oven).

Double false then.
Dutch 'bakken' may be in an oven as well,
'een cake bakken' for example,
Jan
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Pannekoeken are definitely NOT baked in an oven. The word itself (Dutch) points to the use of a 'pan'. A ... a minute. When cooked on a greased hot metal surface (cast-iron) we call them no longer 'pannekoeken' but 'poffertjes' instead.

The difference between 'pannekoeken' and 'poffertjes' is primarily one of size.
'Poffertjes' are lens-shaped with a diametre of about 4 cm.

Jan
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