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I heard recently about a dish called "Egg in a ... then fry an egg in the center of the bread.

My grandmother used to serve this in Chicago around 1970 (and, I suspect, a fair bit before). If I recall ... a name for it, but it escapes me. it wasn't "egg in a hole" or Don Aitken's "gas house egg".

I have had eggs baked inside bread pressed into muffin cups. The bread toasted and the eggs baked until the yolks were solid, (usually). These were called "coddled eggs" and it didn't matter if the yolks broke while being cracked into the bread cups. The bread/egg combo could be easily lifted out and onto plates, and served hot to quite a number of eaters, which was hard to achieve with some other egg preparations.
The advantage of this style of egg-cooking is that the ... with a spatula with less probability of breaking the yoke.

Wouldn't want the oxen to escape, innit?

You know, I looked at that spelling and knew it wasn't correct, but couldn't - for the life of me - think of "yolk" at the time. I don't mind making an inadvertent error, but when I know it's an error and can't think of the correct word it alarms me. The little gray cells must be oozing out at night.
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My grandmother used to serve this in Chicago around 1970 ... "egg in a hole" or Don Aitken's "gas house egg".

I have had eggs baked inside bread pressed into muffin cups. The bread toasted and the eggs baked until the ... plates, and served hot to quite a number of eaters, which was hard to achieve with some other egg preparations.

That would be a Scotch Egg, wouldn't it? A coddled egg is either cooked in the shell in boiling water or cooked in an egg coddler. We have egg coddlers and egg cups, but rarely get them out. We used to have a silver scissor-like thing that sliced off the top of a coddled egg when it was cooked in the shell and served in an egg cup. The thingy disappeared, though.
My mother made coddled eggs frequently and served them in egg cups. We'd scrape out the egg and squash it up with crumbled graham crackers.
I have had eggs baked inside bread pressed into muffin ... which was hard to achieve with some other egg preparations.

That would be a Scotch Egg, wouldn't it?

No, no!
A Scotch Egg is hardboiled, surrounded by sausage meat and then, I think, deep fried and served cold.
See a picture at www.citypaper.com/2002-03-06/ cheap-1.jpg

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Pannekoeken are definitely NOT baked in an oven. The word ... (cast-iron) we call them no longer 'pannekoeken' but 'poffertjes' instead.

The difference between 'pannekoeken' and 'poffertjes' is primarily one of size. 'Poffertjes' are lens-shaped with a diametre of about 4 cm.

Then I have also heard the word "flensjes" used in the context of pannenkoeken - but was never sure if this was just a synonym or it indicated a substantive difference.
And poffertjes - indeed lens shaped (two convex surfaces) which (in my experience) requires a special poffertjespan with indentations to accommodate the poffertjes.
But such a pan doesn't have a flat bottom, so it can't be used on an electric cooker - you have to have gas. Trying to make poffertjes over the hot coals of a barbecue doesn't work worth a damn either...
Jitze
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The difference between 'pannekoeken' and 'poffertjes' is primarily one of size. 'Poffertjes' are lens-shaped with a diametre of about 4 cm.

Then I have also heard the word "flensjes" used in the context of pannenkoeken - but was never sure if this was just a synonym or it indicated a substantive difference.

The same, but I think they tend to be smaller.
And a more pretentious usage.
And poffertjes - indeed lens shaped (two convex surfaces) which (in my experience) requires a special poffertjespan with indentations to accommodate the poffertjes.

Indeed. With perhaps 15 holes (haven't counted) for home use up to hundreds of holes in a specialized restaurant. (Poffertjeshuis or Poffertjeskraam)
The 'poffertjes' are turned over with a fork.
Trained cooks can produce at incredible speed.
They are usually eaten with a butter and sugar added.
But such a pan doesn't have a flat bottom, so it can't be used on an electric cooker - you have to have gas. Trying to make poffertjes over the hot coals of a barbecue doesn't work worth a damn either...

Two kinds exist,
Pressed steel ones, indeed not flat bottemed,
and heavy cast iron ones with a flat bottom.
The latter type requires more skill:
it is necessary to keep up production at a constant rate to match the heat flow from below,
since the cast iron reacts only slowly.
If you don't keep up production the butter will burn. Guess you could do it of a barbeque too,
if you really wanted to.
Best,
Jan
That would be a Scotch Egg, wouldn't it?

No, no! A Scotch Egg is hardboiled, surrounded by sausage meat and then, I think, deep fried and served cold.

I forgot that the Scotch Egg is a hard-boiled egg, but it is surrounded by a bread-like mixture of flour, egg, and breadcrumbs in addition to the sausage.
I heard recently about a dish called "Egg in a ... then fry an egg in the center of the bread.

My grandmother used to serve this in Chicago around 1970 (and, I suspect, a fair bit before). If I recall ... a name for it, but it escapes me. it wasn't "egg in a hole" or Don Aitken's "gas house egg".

I've eaten it lots of times - we often do it that way when cooking breakfast on a barbecue. However, I've never heard a name for it.

Rob Bannister
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Robert Bannister filted:
My grandmother used to serve this in Chicago around 1970 ... "egg in a hole" or Don Aitken's "gas house egg".

I've eaten it lots of times - we often do it that way when cooking breakfast on a barbecue. However, I've never heard a name for it.

"Picture-frame eggs", when I learned the presentation about the same time Evan did...we also scrambled another egg and dipped the hollowed-out slice of bread in it before putting it in the pan, so what we got was an egg in the middle of a piece of French toast..r
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