In another newsgroup, I've been involved in a discussion with a poster from Belgium about the nature of "pannekoeken." I stated that pannekoeken are oven-baked pancakes, and as a result are lighter than ordinary pancakes. He insisted that pannekoeken are not oven-baked.
So I called the Pannekoeken Huis Family Restaurant in Maplewood, Minnesota. I asked the lady who answered whether pannekoeken were baked in the oven and she replied that they were. I then asked if they had anything they called "pannekoeken" which was not baked in the oven, and she replied that they had regular pancakes but they did not call them "pannekoeken." Finally, I mentioned that I was replying in a newsgroup to someone from the Netherlands that was an error, it was someone from Belgium who insisted that pannekoeken were not baked in the oven, and I wanted to verify that here pannekoeken are always baked in the oven. She said, "Yes, here pannekoeken are always baked in the oven."
I posted about this in the other newsgroup, and speculated that this was perhaps a case of a word being adopted from one language to another with a more narrow sense. I gave the example of "tilde," which in English means the accent mark used over the "n" in Spanish words such as "caƱon," while in Spanish "tilde" has the more general meaning of "accent mark." I asked the poster to whom I was replying whether pannekoeken are ever baked in the oven in Belgium or the Netherlands. He has not yet replied.

A Google search of English-language pages turns up other uses of "pannekoeken" to mean an oven-baked pancake. My question is, first, if you have eaten pannekoeken in your area and if so, what country are you writing from were they baked in an oven and second, if you live in Belgium or the Netherlands (hi, Donna!), are pannekoeken ever baked in the oven there?

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
(snip)
A Google search of English-language pages turns up other uses of "pannekoeken" to mean an oven-baked pancake. My question is, ... and second, if you live in Belgium or the Netherlands (hi, Donna!), are pannekoeken ever baked in the oven there?

Sorry, no, not that I ever heard of, nor my daughter either. They are cooked in a skillet/frying pan on the top of the stove. One big one per time, like a crepe. In fact a lot of houses in the Netherlands don't even have ovens they're not big on baking. Nowadays, many people have bought combination microwave/conventional ovens that sit on the countertop.
Maybe a long time ago whenever those Dutch settlers brought the idea to Minnesota the style of pancakes was different.

By the way, since the mid-1990s spelling reform, it's pannenkoek and pannenkoeken. I found it amazing that spelling reformers would deliberately insert silent letters into the middle of words, but it's a grammatical thing. (Kinda like trade union, trades union.)

Best Donna Richoux
(snip)

A Google search of English-language pages turns up other uses ... (hi, Donna!), are pannekoeken ever baked in the oven there?

Sorry, no, not that I ever heard of, nor my daughter either. They are cooked in a skillet/frying pan on ... deliberately insert silent letters into the middle of words, but it's a grammatical thing. (Kinda like trade union, trades union.)

Thanks for the information, Donna.
I just found the following. You might call it an official Minnesota recipe -) because it comes from Pillsbury, which is based in Minnesota.(1)

From the newsgroup rec.food.cooking , archived by Google at http://groups.google.com/groups?selm=barbschaller-788F62.07443713082002%40News.CIS.DFN.DE&oe=UTF-...

or
http://tinyurl.com/x3f4
(begin quote of Usenet post)
OB Food:
{ Exported from MasterCook Mac }
Pannekoeken
Recipe By: Pillsbury
Serving Size: 2
Preparation Time: 0:00
Categories: Entrees
Amount Measure Ingredient Preparation Method
Pancake:
1/2 cup Pillsbury all purpose or unbleached flour
2 Tbsp. sugar1/4 tsp. salt
1/2 cup milk

2 eggs (*or 1 whole egg + 1 egg white)
2 Tbsp. margarine or butterFruit Topping:
1/2 cup sugar

1 Tbsp. cornstarch1/2 cup orange juice

2 Tbsp. orange-flavored liqueur or orange juice
3 cups sliced fruits and/or berries (strawberries pineapple, kiwi,melons, banana, peaches - whatever)
Heat oven to 425?. Lightly spoon flour into measuring cup; level off. In medium bowl, combine all pancake ingredients except margarine. Beat with wire whisk or rotary beater until smooth. Place margarine in 9-inch (glass) pie pan; melt in 425? oven just until margarine sizzles,
2 to 4 minutes. Remove pan from oven; tilt to coat bottom with meltedmargarine. Immediately pour batter into hot pan. Bake at 425? for 14-18 minutes or until puffed and golden brown. (Some margarine may rise to the surface of pancake during baking.)
Meanwhile, in small saucepan combine 1/2 cup sugar and cornstarch; mix well. Stir in orange juice and liqueur. Cook and stir over medium heat 5-7 minutes or until sugar dissolves and mixture thickens. Remove pancake from oven; immediately arrange peaches and strawberries over pancake and drizzle with orange sauce. Cut into wedges. Serve immediately. 2-3 servings.
One-third of recipe (using 2 whole eggs) is 460 calories, 145 mg cholesterol, 12 g fat.
Source: Pillsbury cookbook #159, Springtime Brunches and Parties, May 1994, page 21. *Made 5/8/94 using 1 egg white as substitute for 1 whole egg and couldn't detect any difference.

Notes: Pillsbury 5/94 booklet.
Per serving (excluding unknown items): 322 Calories; 2g Fat (6% calories from fat); 2g Protein; 75g Carbohydrate; 8mg Cholesterol; 298mg Sodium Food Exchanges: 4 1/2 Fruit; 1/2 Fat; 4 Other Carbohydrates

(end quote from Usenet post)
Note:
(1) It used to be based in Minneapolis, but Pillsbury employees moved out of Pillsbury Center in Minneapolis in October and went to the main company campus the main company being General Mills in Golden Valley, Minnesota. The Minneapolis building has subsequently been renamed.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
I just found the following. You might call it an official Minnesota recipe :-) because it comes from Pillsbury, which ... oven; immediately arrange peaches and strawberries over pancake and drizzle with orange sauce. Cut into wedges. Serve immediately. 2-3 servings.

This looks to me like a sweet version of a Yorkshire pudding.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Heat oven to 425?. Lightly spoon flour into measuring cup; ... 425? for 14-18 minutes or until puffed and golden brown.

I cooked them at 425 but they were burned to a crisp. What went wrong?
Alan
I cooked them at 425 but they were burned to a crisp. What went wrong? Alan

Your oven is calibrated in Reamur.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I cooked them at 425 but they were burned to a crisp. What went wrong?

You should have waited until 4.30.
m.
I cooked them at 425 but they were burned to a crisp. What went wrong? Alan

Don't ask me - it was Ray who posted the recipe.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
In another newsgroup, I've been involved in a discussion with a poster from Belgium about the nature of "pannekoeken." I stated that pannekoeken are oven-baked pancakes, and as a result are lighter than ordinary pancakes. He insisted that pannekoeken are not oven-baked.

In America perhaps, but the original Dutch 'pannekoeken' are not oven-baked. Like French 'crepes' they are made in an iron pan over a fire. French ones tend to be thinner, and larger.
Pannekoeken can be plain, or filled with al kinds of things, like apple slices, or cheese. In the Netherlands and Belgium you can still find panne(n)koekenrestaurants, where you can order nothing else. They are usually called 'Pannekoekenhuis', or something similar.

And to my regret I have to inform you
that the spelling 'pannekoeken'
is no longer officially correct Dutch since 1996.
It is 'pannenkoeken' since then,
and that is how it has to be written in official documents and by schoolchildren.
However, not all native writers accept the change. Many other words acquired a middle 'n' too at the sme time.

Best,
Jan

"Zij hebben geen ruggengraat" (Rudy Kousbroek)
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